Resource Database

©Danilo Lima, Agripalm Ambiental

The RRC database contains a wide variety of resources and publications related to ecological restoration, and we are actively working to expand this collection. It is our aim to serve as the principal clearinghouse for information and tools to support the work of researchers, practitioners, land managers, educators, students, and anyone else interested in restoration. Use the filter tool below to search the database by title, author, resource type, keyword, or any combination of these factors.

Although SER does review all entries in the database for relevance and quality, these resources have not been rigorously reviewed or extensively vetted in every case, and SER therefore makes no claim as to their accuracy or accordance with generally accepted principles in the field. The database is provided as a resource for visitors to the SER website, and it is ultimately left to the individual user to make their own determinations about the quality and veracity of a given publication or resource.

If there is a resource we missed, please let us know! We are interested in current books, articles, technical documents, videos, and other resources that are directly relevant to ecological restoration science, practice or policy, as well as resources treating the social, cultural and economic dimensions of restoration.

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Resource Type
Keyword
Title
Author
 

US Army Corps of Engineers Ecosystem Restoration Gateway

Ecosystem Restoration is one of the primary missions of the Civil Works program. The purpose of Civil Works ecosystem restoration activities is to restore significant ecosystem function, structure, and dynamic processes that have been degraded. Ecosystem restoration efforts involve a comprehensive examination of the problems contributing to the system degradation, and the development of alternative means for their solution. The intent of restoration is to partially or fully reestablish the attributes of a naturalistic, functioning, and self-regulating system.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: N/A

US Army Corps of Engineers Management Measures Digital Library

The purpose of this site is to identify and describe examples of selected ecosystem engineering features or management measures and their components. This site is not intended to be a design manual, but rather to provide sufficient information to stimulate plan formulation and assist planners in identifying what’s out there and to “visualize” how a management measure or engineering feature may be applicable to their project.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: N/A

Ecological Management & Restoration (EMR) Project Summaries

The Australasian journal Ecological Management & Restoration (EMR) is open to submission of short summaries (or groups of linked summaries) of 300-700 words on any interesting ecosystem rehabilitation or restoration project in Australia that is already showing good or promising results. These project summaries are published on an open-access website managed by the journal’s editorial team. They are not a peer-reviewed manuscript type in EMR, but are checked for clarity and content by the project summaries editor.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: N/A

Restoration Evidence

Restoration Evidence is a free resource that aims to make ecological restoration more effective by providing evidence on which restoration actions work, and which don’t. The searchable website contains summaries of scientific research on the effects of actions to restore habitats, in order to support decision making.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: launched in 2018

Tropical Native Species Reforestation Information Clearinghouse (TRIC)

The Tropical Native Species Reforestation Information Clearinghouse (TRIC) is a resource hosted by the Environmental Leadership and Training Initiative (ELTI) and aims to support capacity-building in the field of tropical forest restoration and reforestation. TRIC users can search by resource type, topic, country, region and ecosystem to find valuable reforestation resources. Users can also submit suggested resources for addition to the database.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2018

Reef Resilience Network

The Reef Resilience Network connects marine resource managers with information, experts, resources, and skill-building opportunities to accelerate and leverage solutions for improved conservation and restoration of coral reefs and reef fisheries around the world. The Network is a partnership led by The Nature Conservancy that is comprised of more than 1,350 members, and supported by dozens of partners and TNC staff, as well as over 100 global experts in coral reefs, fisheries, climate change, communication, and more who serve as trainers, advisors, and content reviewers. The Network strengthens members’ ability to effectively manage coral reefs threatened by warming seas, bleaching, coastal development, pollution, overfishing, and changes in ocean chemistry. To achieve this, they synthesize and share the latest science and management strategies to keep busy managers inspired and in-the-know. The website is updated by global experts and features the latest information on key topics, easily searchable summaries of journal articles featuring resilience science, and case studies highlighting successful management strategies and new application of science. They also connect managers and experts to share resources and lessons learned that inform and improve management decisions and inspire greater collaborations.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2018

Reproductive phenology and seed germination in eight tree species from a seasonally dry tropical forest of Morelos, Mexico, implications for community-oriented restoration and conservation

With the aim of providing information for ecological restoration programs, we studied reproductive phenology and seed germination of eight species from the tropical dry forest of Morelos, Mexico. With the participation of students from the local junior high school, we monitored monthly, over one year, the production of flowers, immature and mature fruits for each species. We estimated intensity, duration, seasonality, and synchrony for each fruiting phenophase, and flowering duration. Germination tests were undertaken in a germination chamber (1832 °C), and under the environmental conditions at the local school. We applied specific pre-germination treatments for each species. Two distinct peaks of mature fruit production were identified: one at the beginning and the other one in the middle of the dry season. Fructification seasonality was significant in most cases. Germination was relatively high in three legumes and particularly low in two Bursera species. Four species responded to the germination environments, and differences among pre-germination treatments were significant in most cases. Knowledge on fruiting patterns and seed viability and germination will allow adequate decision-making for seed collection and plant propagation of the study species. Student participation increased their interest and knowledge on local environmental problems and solutions.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2018

Oportunidades y desafíos para la gobernanza de la restauración del paisaje forestal en América Latina

El presente informe contiene los resultados de una investigación, predominantemente cualitativa, que analiza los marcos legales que regulan la protección de los bosques y las actividades forestales restaurativas en 17 países de América Latina. Empleamos para ello dos herramientas de análisis: (1) un análisis sistemático del contenido y la estructura de los marcos legales a partir de una serie de indicadores predefinidos y (2) un análisis sobre las percepciones de actores públicos y privados acerca del contenido, estructura e implementación de los marcos legales. Finalmente, sintetizamos los resultados en relación a las oportunidades y desafíos de los marcos legales existentes en la región con el fin de proponer recomendaciones para mejorar este aspecto de la gobernanza de la Restauración del Paisaje Forestal en Latinoamérica.

This report, published in Spanish, contains the results of a qualitative study analyzing the legal frameworks that regulate activities related to the protection and restoration of forests in 17 Latin American countries. The study used two analytical methods: (1) a systematic analysis of the content and structure of relevant legal frameworks based on a series of predetermined indicators, and (2) an analysis of the perceptions of stakeholders in the public and private sectors with respect to the content, structure and implementation of these legal frameworks. Lastly, the report synthesizes findings regarding the opportunities and challenges presented by existing legal frameworks in the region and presents recommendations for improving Forest and Landscape Restoration governance in Latin America.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2018

Principles and practices for the restoration of ponderosa pine and dry mixed-conifer forests of the Colorado Front Range

Wildfires have become larger and more severe over the past several decades on Colorado’s Front Range, catalyzing greater investments in forest management intended to mitigate wildfire risks. The complex ecological, social, and political context of the Front Range, however, makes forest management challenging, especially where multiple management goals including forest restoration exist. In this report, the authors present a science-based framework for managers to develop place-based approaches to forest restoration of Front Range ponderosa pine and dry mixed-conifer forests. The authors first present ecological information describing how Front Range forest structure and composition are shaped at multiple scales by interactions among topography, natural disturbances such as fire, and forest developmental processes.  Implementation of these guidelines is expected to enhance forest resilience to disturbance and climate change, as well as sustain important ecosystem services. Finally, this report emphasizes the importance of adaptive management and learning through monitoring and experimentation to address uncertainties inherent in the restoration process.

Resource Type: Technical Document
Publication Date: 2018

The global status and trends of Payments for Ecosystem Services

Recent decades have witnessed a considerable increase in Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES)—programmes that exchange value for land management practices intended to provide or ensure ecosystem services—with over 550 active programmes around the globe and an estimated US$36–42 billion in annual transactions. PES represent a recent policy instrument with often very different programmes operating at local, regional and national levels. Despite the growth of these programmes, comprehensive and reliable data have proven difficult to find. This Analysis provides an assessment of the trends and current status of PES mechanisms—user-financed, government-financed and compliance—across the domains of water, biodiversity, and forest and land-use carbon around the world. We report the various dimensions of growth over the past decade (number of programmes, geographical spread, dollar value) to understand better the range of PES mechanisms over time and to examine which factors have contributed to or hindered growth. Four key features stand out for scaling up PES: motivated buyers, motivated sellers, metrics and low-transaction-cost institutions.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2018

Decision support tools for forest landscape restoration: Current status and future outlook

Decision-making bodies at all scales face an urgent need to conserve remaining forests, and reestablish forest cover in deforested and degraded forest landscapes. Degradation is often viewed as ‘the problem’, and restoration as ‘the solution’. But, rather than being a goal, restoration is the means to achieve many goals. Despite the many advances in the development and application of decision support tools in FLR, this review reveals a gap in tools for the implementation of landscape-scale restoration initiatives and for guiding monitoring and adaptive management. The review also reveals that available tools primarily focus on assessing restoration opportunities at a broader scale, rather than within landscapes where implementation occurs. Evidence from research on community-based conservation and forest management suggests that tools for the empowerment, land rights and capacity building of local residents can help nurture strong coalitions of landscape restoration practitioners that apply adaptive management of restoration interventions, and evaluate potential restoration scenarios in their own landscapes.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2018

Harnessing ecological processes to facilitate coral restoration

Incorporating ecological processes into restoration planning is increasingly recognized as a fundamental component of successful restoration strategies. We outline a scientific framework to advance the emerging field of coral restoration. We advocate for harnessing ecological processes that drive community dynamics on coral reefs in a way that facilitates the establishment and growth of restored corals.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2018

Partnering with Nature: The case for natural regeneration in forest and landscape restoration

Natural regeneration is a cost-effective, nature-based tool for restoration that enhances resilience, supports local biodiversity, and supplies multiple ecosystem goods and services. However, for social, cultural and economic reasons, the potential of natural regeneration for achieving large-scale restoration objectives and climate mitigation targets is often overlooked. This information brief makes specific recommendations for policy changes that could enhance the role of natural regeneration in ecological restoration interventions and as an integral component of forest and landscape restoration.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2017

Invasive Species Summit: Restoration and Long-term Management

On November 3, 2017, New York Botanical Garden and the Lower Hudson Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISM) co-presented “Invasive Species Summit: Restoration and Long-term Management”. Five experts shared their insights about best practices to manage and restore ecosystems, and led audience conversation about how to establish goals, prioritize, take action to implement projects, and overcome challenges to achieve long-term success at both small- and large-scale sites. A recording of the full program is available on the NYBG YouTube Channel.

Resource Type: Audio/Video
Publication Date: 2017

Ecological Restoration and the Law: Recovering Nature’s Past for the Future

This special edition of the Griffith Law Review, the first of its kind in the world, investigates the emerging legal interventions, both those officially sanctioned and informally applied, to recover nature’s past for the future. These interventions range from the sporadic acknowledgments of ecological restoration in transnational law, such as in the Convention on Biological Diversity and the European Union’s Habitats Directive, to national-level initiatives such as the Collaborative Landscape Restoration Program implemented in the United States under the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009. The articles that follow help us to critically evaluate the character and impact of current regulations and other governance mechanisms that address ecological restoration, to advance theoretical understandings for better governance reforms for ecological restoration, and more broadly to generate critical and interdisciplinary insights into environmental law.

Resource Type: Journal Special Issue
Publication Date: 2017

A systematic review of ecological attributes that confer resilience to climate change in environmental restoration

Ecological restoration is widely practiced as a means of rehabilitating ecosystems and habitats that have been degraded or impaired through human use or other causes. Restoration practices now are confronted by climate change, which has the potential to influence long-term restoration outcomes. Concepts and attributes from the resilience literature can help improve restoration and monitoring efforts under changing climate conditions. We systematically examined the published literature on ecological resilience to identify biological, chemical, and physical attributes that confer resilience to climate change.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2017

Roots of Prosperity: The economics and finance of restoring land

The premise of this report is that there is an urgent need to increase financing for restoration, and there are many pathways to make this happen. This publication explains seven key barriers to investment in restoration and highlights policy solutions and financial mechanisms—many of which are already in play—that can be used to overcome these barriers. Through a discussion of the financial and economic issues surrounding restoration, the report encourages governments and practitioners to conduct analyses and enact strategies that support forest and landscape restoration.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2017

Ecological Restoration in International Environmental Law

This is the first published book to examine comprehensively the relationship between international environmental law and ecological restoration. While international environmental law (IEL) has developed significantly as a discipline over the past four decades, this book enquires whether IEL can now assist states in making a strategic transition from not just protecting and maintaining the natural environment but also actively restoring it. Arguing that states have international duties to restore, this book offers reflections on the philosophical context of ecological restoration and the legal content of a duty to restore from an international law, European Union law and national law perspective. The book concludes with a discussion of several contemporary themes of interest to both lawyers and ecologists including the role of private actors, protected areas and climate change in ecological restoration.

Resource Type: Book
Publication Date: 2017

Securing forest tenure rights for rural development : Lessons from six countries in Latin America

Secure land tenure in rural landscapes is widely recognized as an essential foundation for achieving a range of economic development goals. However, forest areas in low and middle-income countries face particular challenges in strengthening the security of land and resource tenure. Forest peoples are often among the poorest and most politically marginalized communities in their national contexts, and their tenure systems are often based on customary, collective rights that have insufficient formal legal protection. This study on Securing Forest Tenure Rights for Rural Development aims to contribute to efforts worldwide to reduce poverty and strengthen sustainable management in forest areas. It does so by reviewing the progress of tenure reforms in six countries in Latin America, and drawing lessons to help advance the realization of these reforms and inform similar initiatives in other countries.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2017

Anthropogenic ecosystem disturbance and the recovery debt

Ecosystem recovery from anthropogenic disturbances, either without human intervention or assisted by ecological restoration, is increasingly occurring worldwide. As ecosystems progress through recovery, it is important to estimate any resulting deficit in biodiversity and functions. Here we use data from 3,035 sampling plots worldwide, to quantify the interim reduction of biodiversity and functions occurring during the recovery process (that is, the ‘recovery debt’). Compared with reference levels, recovering ecosystems run annual deficits of 46–51% for organism abundance, 27–33% for species diversity, 32–42% for carbon cycling and 31–41% for nitrogen cycling. Results are consistent across biomes but not across degrading factors. Results suggest that recovering and restored ecosystems have less abundance, diversity and cycling of carbon and nitrogen than ‘undisturbed’ ecosystems, and that even if complete recovery is reached, an interim recovery debt will accumulate. Under such circumstances, increasing the quantity of less-functional ecosystems through ecological restoration and offsetting are inadequate alternatives to ecosystem protection.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2017

Forest landscape restoration: increasing the positive impacts of forest restoration or simply the area under tree cover?

Restoring forest landscapes is critical in the face of continued global forest loss and degradation. In this article, we explore some challenges underlying the delivery of global commitments to restore forest landscapes. We propose that three fundamental questions need to be resolved upfront for the effective implementation of Forest Landscape Restoration and related commitments: (1) What social and ecological landscape objectives are being sought through Forest Landscape Restoration? (2) How are specific areas being selected for restoration? (3) How is success measured when restoring forest
landscapes? We believe that there is an urgent need to adequately answer these questions to successfully implement political commitments for large-scale forest restoration.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2017

Forest landscape restoration in hilly and mountainous regions

This is a special issue of International Forestry Review on Forest Landscape Restoration in Hilly and Mountainous Regions. While the growing literature on FLR and associated methodologies being proposed emphasizes the importance of including stakeholders in decision making and implementation, local communities in hilly and mountainous regions often face particular challenges. The papers in this Special Issue of the International Forestry Review shed light on some of the approaches incorporated in FLR design and its outcomes in cases from China, Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam.

Resource Type: Journal Special Issue
Publication Date: 2017

Implementing forest landscape restoration: A practitioner’s guide

This guide is intended to be a training resource for FLR facilitators who have a broad approach to land management. The guide is also aimed at anyone who implements FLR in a specific country or local context. Thus, policymakers and practitioners considering FLR commitments can use this guide to gain an understanding of the complexities of actual implementation.

Resource Type: Technical Document
Publication Date: 2017

Gender matters in Forest Landscape Restoration: A framework for design and evaluation

The essence of gender-responsive Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR) is ensuring that women and men at all levels have equal voice and influence in strategic decisions related to FLR, and that this contributes to substantive equality in outcomes for women and men. Free and Prior Informed Consent’, ‘fair’ and ‘just’ compensation, and impartial and effective grievance mechanisms for all those affected are critical to safeguarding the rights of local and indigenous women and men. Decisions about target areas for restoration, choice of stakeholders for FLR governance and how to include them, restoration approaches, priority species and how to monitor progress should be made following gender-inclusive participatory processes to capitalize on the knowledge and experiences of both women and men. Mechanisms and measures at various scales are required to equitably distribute benefits and costs associated with restoration for both women and men in participating communities.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2017

Status and trends of dam removal research in the United States

Aging infrastructure coupled with growing interest in river restoration has driven a dramatic increase in the practice of dam removal. With this increase, there has been a proliferation of studies that assess the physical and ecological responses of rivers to these removals. As more dams are considered for removal, scientific information from these dam-removal studies will increasingly be called upon to inform decisions about whether, and how best, to bring down dams.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2017

Ecología de la restauración en México: estado actual y perspectivas

This article synthesizes the results of a literature review to assess the state of the art of ecological restoration in Mexico, including current perspectives and challenges within the national context. The authors looked at a number of different sources in conducting their review, including publications, conferences, institutions working in the space, research trends, and capacity building opportunities. The article presents a synthesis of current trends in the field and discusses gaps and deficiencies. It also discusses the need for a national policy around restoration science as well as long-term funding sources to support continued development of restoration in Mexico.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2017

Applying seed-based approaches to ecological restoration

Stephanie Frischie, Chris Helzer, and Todd Erickson present the rationale and successive steps that are required for the efficient delivery and use of seeds in ecological restoration. Case studies from prairie ecosystems in North America and the hot deserts of north-western Australia illustrate the process.

Resource Type: Audio/Video
Publication Date: 2017

Bioinvasion: When does it really matter?

Presented by Dr. David Sabaj-Stahl of the SER Northwest chapter. Novel approaches were developed to assess the occurrence and potential impacts of spatial autocorrelation on correlation analyses involving invasive/native species and related community constructs. Results suggest new significance levels are warranted for correlation analyses. The sequential reduction of autocorrelation in the data revealed habitat- v. ecosystem-level effects and non-effects relative to bioinvasion. Taken together, these outcomes provide a novel framework for prioritizing land management and restoration-related decisions.

Resource Type: Audio/Video
Publication Date: 2017

The business perspective in ecological restoration: issues and challenges

Much of the practice of restoration is conducted by businesses—contractors, consultants, designers, engineers. Restoration businesses interact with a variety of stakeholders to complete projects on time and on budget, and to achieve ecological and business objectives. Our research explores the business perspective in restoration based on data collected from businesses (contractors, consultants, design engineers), agencies, and nongovernmental organizations involved in a Superfund cleanup project in Montana, one of the largest river restoration efforts ever.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2017

Steelhead conservation concerns amid accelerating climate dynamism

Resource Type: Audio/Video
Publication Date: 2017