Resource Database

©Danilo Lima, Agripalm Ambiental

The RRC database contains a wide variety of resources and publications related to ecological restoration, and we are actively working to expand this collection. It is our aim to serve as the principal clearinghouse for information and tools to support the work of researchers, practitioners, land managers, educators, students, and anyone else interested in restoration. Use the filter tool below to search the database by title, author, resource type, keyword, or any combination of these factors.

Although SER does review all entries in the database for relevance and quality, these resources have not been rigorously reviewed or extensively vetted in every case, and SER therefore makes no claim as to their accuracy or accordance with generally accepted principles in the field. The database is provided as a resource for visitors to the SER website, and it is ultimately left to the individual user to make their own determinations about the quality and veracity of a given publication or resource.

If there is a resource we missed, please let us know! We are interested in current books, articles, technical documents, videos, and other resources that are directly relevant to ecological restoration science, practice or policy, as well as resources treating the social, cultural and economic dimensions of restoration.

Publication Year:
Resource Type
Keyword
Title
Author

 

Celebrating 25 Years of Action for Biodiversity

Abstract:

In celebration of the International Day for Biological Diversity on 22 May 2018, Wiley has put together a special collection of over 100 research articles from 12 journals highlighting important contributions to advancing the understanding, protection, and preservation of biodiversity. Articles come from numerous fields in the natural and social sciences. They are free to share, read and download for a limited time.

Resource Type:Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: various

Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetic Resources

Abstract:

The Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetics Resources (RNGR) website is a popular resource for those who grow or outplant native plants for reforestation, restoration, or conservation. The site hosts a national directory of forestry and conservation nurseries, a calendar of relevant events, and access to a repository of approximately 15,000 articles  (searchable and free to download). The site also includes pages specific to tropical plants, tribal nurseries, and seed.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing

Roadside revegetation: An integrated approach to establishing native plants and pollinator habitat

Abstract:

The roadsides of the United States play an important role in the conservation of declining wild pollinators and in supporting the health of managed pollinators. The An Integrated Approach to Establishing Native Plants and Pollinator Habitat program provides current best practices for planning, designing, and implementing a revegetation project that will also create habitat for pollinators. The web resource offers a comprehensive Roadside Revegetation Report detailing the complete roadside revegetation process, from project initiation, through monitoring and management. It is also home to the Ecoregional Revegetation Application online tool and a Roadside Revegetation online library.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing

SER Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner (CERP) Program

Abstract:

SER’s Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner (CERP) Program encourages a high professional standard for those who are designing, implementing, overseeing, and monitoring restoration projects throughout the world.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
By developing criteria for restoration practitioners to be approved for CERP, and continuing education requirements for maintenance or certification, the CERP program contributes to activity B10. Certified practitioners, in turn, can contribute to activities C1, C3, C4, and C5 regarding restoration planning and implementation, and activities D1, D2, and D3 regarding project monitoring.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing

Restoration Resource Center (RRC)

Abstract:

SER’s Restoration Resource Center (RRC) provides hundreds of examples of restoration projects, as well links to science, technology and traditional knowledge about restoration from around the world. A wide variety of other resources to assist with restoration planning can also be found on the SER website.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
The RRC contains many resources relevant to Group of activities C and D. Of particular importance for is a restoration directory of expertise, and a resource database that can be filtered by publication year, resources type, title, author, and keyword. A project database provides many examples of restoration implementation (C5), and contribute to sharing lessons learned, in line with activity D3.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing

Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism (FLRM) Knowledge Base

Abstract:

This knowledge base provides access to a comprehensive database of resources related to forest and landscape restoration in a wide range of aspects. More specifically, it provides access to an online user-friendly platform where users can find guidance from planning and implementation to the ongoing management and monitoring of a restoration project.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
This resource includes information on many aspects of FLR including assessment of degradation / restoration opportunities (activities A1 and A2), governance (activities B1 and B6), and implementation (activity C5), and monitoring (Group D). Documents such as Global guidelines for the restoration of degraded forests and landscapes in drylands, outline monitoring and evaluation programs including assessment (D1), adaptive management (D2), and sharing lessons learned (D3).

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing

Bonn Challenge Barometer

Abstract:

The Bonn Challenge Barometer is a progress tracking protocol for the Bonn Challenge, a global effort to bring 150 million hectares of degraded and deforested land into restoration by 2020 and 350 million by 2030. It aims to provide a flexible framework for the development of indicators by jurisdictions who pledged to the Bonn Challenge and to report on progress on various dimensions of Forest and Landscape Restoration (FLR).

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
By providing a common platform for countries to report on the outcomes of their FLR strategies along standard criteria, the Bonn Challenge Barometer allows for the sharing of lessons learned and exchange of information, in line with Activity D3.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing

Biodiversity Indicators Partnership (BIP)

Abstract:

The Biodiversity Indicators Partnership (BIP) is a global initiative to promote and coordinate the development and delivery of biodiversity indicators for use by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and other biodiversity-related conventions, the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and national and regional agencies. The website allows users to browse a range of indicators related to Aichi Biodiversity Targets, as well as a library of resources for the development of national-scale indicators.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
The BIP resource provides tools to identify relevant indicators for assessing multiple restoration objectives directly relevant to CBD goals and targets (D1), to test and refine indicators (D2), and to develop monitoring and reporting systems (D3).

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing

US Army Corps of Engineers Ecosystem Restoration Gateway

Abstract:

Ecosystem Restoration is one of the primary missions of the Civil Works program. The purpose of Civil Works ecosystem restoration activities is to restore significant ecosystem function, structure, and dynamic processes that have been degraded. Ecosystem restoration efforts involve a comprehensive examination of the problems contributing to the system degradation, and the development of alternative means for their solution. The intent of restoration is to partially or fully reestablish the attributes of a naturalistic, functioning, and self-regulating system.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: N/A

US Army Corps of Engineers Management Measures Digital Library

Abstract:

The purpose of this site is to identify and describe examples of selected ecosystem engineering features or management measures and their components. This site is not intended to be a design manual, but rather to provide sufficient information to stimulate plan formulation and assist planners in identifying what’s out there and to “visualize” how a management measure or engineering feature may be applicable to their project.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: N/A

Ecological Management & Restoration (EMR) Project Summaries

Abstract:

The Australasian journal Ecological Management & Restoration (EMR) is open to submission of short summaries (or groups of linked summaries) of 300-700 words on any interesting ecosystem rehabilitation or restoration project in Australia that is already showing good or promising results. These project summaries are published on an open-access website managed by the journal’s editorial team. They are not a peer-reviewed manuscript type in EMR, but are checked for clarity and content by the project summaries editor.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: N/A

Restoration Evidence

Abstract:

Restoration Evidence is a free resource developed by the Endangered Landscapes Programme that aims to make ecological restoration more effective by providing evidence about the effectiveness of specific restoration actions. The searchable website contains summaries of scientific research on the effects of actions to restore habitats, in order to support decision making. Actions are categorized by the target habitat or species. Summaries of evidence are available for the ecological restoration of forests, peatland vegetation, shrublands and heathlands, and farmland, and for restoration actions aimed at enhancing populations of birds, amphibians, bees, bats and primates.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
This resource is particularly relevant for Activity C1 in that it helps assess the ecological appropriateness of different restoration measures for different ecosystems or particular taxonomic groups. Its grounding in scientific research also makes us of existing science, in line with Activity C5.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: launched in 2018

Rewilding complex ecosystems

Abstract:

Humans have encroached upon a majority of Earth’s lands. The current extinction crisis is a testament to human impacts on wilderness. If there is any hope of retaining a biodiverse planetary system, we must begin to learn how to coexist with, and leave space for, other species. The practice of “rewilding” has emerged as a method for returning wild lands, and wildness, to landscapes we have altered. Perino et al. review this concept and present a framework for implementing it broadly and in a way that considers ongoing human interaction.

Resource Type:Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 26 April 2019

SER-RM Webinar: Wildfire Restoration: After the Feds Leave

Abstract:

The Burn Area Emergency Recovery (BAER) team has produced burn severity maps, USGS debris flow maps and reports. They have moved on to the next emergency. This talk is about cheap action items and tasks. They range from on the ground prescriptions to resources that keep the community safe. It takes time for funding to arrive and more time to determine where it will be spent. But patience is not high on the community’s list.

Speaker Bio: Theresa Springer is a Wildland Fire Rehabilitation Coordinator with the Coalition for the Upper South Platte. In her own words, “Chicken Little/Fearmonger to Clairvoyant/Expert” was a short ride for Theresa. In 2000, her job was to raise awareness that it was not a matter of “if” but “when” then forest would burn. She spread the word that forest fires would just get bigger and bigger. Then on June 8th, 2002, Colorado’s Hayman Fire roared through 138,000 acres and tragically her predictions proved true. Since then, Theresa has led recovery efforts on too many fires to count. She has learned: “Equality is a trait of wildland forest fires. Recovery efforts are anything but equal.”

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER Webinar: Peatland Restoration as a Natural Climate Solution in Minnesota

Abstract:

Wetland restoration is increasingly being considered as a climate change adaptation by conservation organizations globally. Peatlands store as much as 30% of the world’s terrestrial carbon. The Nature Conservancy is developing natural climate solutions (NCS) as an approach to address climate change. Since peatlands are abundant in Minnesota, in the northern U.S., covering approximately 1,400,000 hectares, the TNC regional chapter is assessing the potential for peatland restoration as an NCS strategy. There are 2 to 3 million acres of wetlands classified as histosol soils, mucks with less organic matter than peat, that support other wetlands types  Most organic-soil wetlands in the southern half of Minnesota were drained for agriculture, while about 1/6 of northern peatlands were impacted by drainage for forestry, grazing or agriculture. Although most of the peatlands remain intact, recent research estimates annual loss of 38,000 Mg of carbon from oxidation from drainage. Carbon accumulation rates in Minnesota peatlands have been estimated to range from 0.5 Mg/ha/yr in northern peatlands to 3.0 Mg/ha/yr in southern Minnesota wetlands. Re-wetting of drained peatlands greatly reduces decomposition of organic matter, but can increase release of methane. Logistically it is easier to block shallower ditches surrounded by public lands then deep ditches near pastureland or roads.  Therefore, a three-pronged peatland restoration strategy for is recommended: protect large standing stocks of carbon in peatlands, re-wet partially drained peatlands in the north and restore large southern “mucklands” for short-term carbon sequestration and multiple benefits.

Speaker: Dr. Chris Lenhart is SER’s CERP coordinator and a Research Assistant Professor with the BBE Department at the University of Minnesota and contributes to The Nature Conservancy, Mn-ND-SD chapter. His work focuses on focused on treatment wetlands, stream restoration and water quality management, particularly in agricultural areas.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER-NW Webinar: Tribal leadership and sovereignty and the relevance of restoration planning

Abstract:

This webinar is the second in SER-NW’s series: Inclusion in Ecological Restoration.

Speaker: Dezarae Hayes, Sound Transit Director of Tribal Relations, and the Director of Transportation for the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER-E Webinar: State of Ecological Restoration in Spain

Abstract:

Join Dr. Josu Alday, of Lleida University, to learn about the state of ecological restoration in Spain.

Resource Type:
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER-RM Webinar: Tree regeneration post-wildfire in Southern Rocky Mountains forests

Abstract:

Across the Western United States, wildfires are increasingly posing significant risks to ecosystems and society, largely due to climate warming, increases in human, past land management practices, and increasing development in the wildland urban interface (WUI). Notably, this past an unprecedented series of large wildfires burned extensively in areas of subalpine forest in the Southern Rocky Mountains. To provide insight into how these forests may respond, here I will review recent research that examines the drivers of post-fire regeneration in Colorado’s subalpine forests and the implications for forest management.

Speaker Bio: Sarah Hart is an assistant professor in the Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship at Colorado State University. Her research integrates fine-scale mechanisms with large-scale patterns and processes to understand the causes and consequences of forest disturbance, including wildfire and insect outbreaks.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER Webinar: Developing rehabilitation plans for riparian corridors in arid/semi-arid conditions

Abstract:

In Lebanon, as in other countries worldwide, riparian ecosystems are more susceptible to declines in biodiversity than other terrestrial ecosystems (Sala et al, 2000). Riparian forests cover a surface area of 58 hectares, representing 0.04% of the total forest cover (MoA/FAO, 2005). Considering the existing number of permanent and seasonal streams and rivers in Lebanon, this percentage can be described as low.

The ecological status of riparian habitats in Lebanon has drastically changed, mainly due to land use changes. The privatization of lands adjacent to riverbanks has led to the noticeable land cover changes in riparian areas. Major areas have turned into intensive agricultural and industrial activities, with a lack of urban planning regulation on important buffer zones and impacting natural resources and functions of riparian areas . In addition, as a result of the continuing political conflicts in the region, refugee settlements near rivers have added pressure on riparian ecosystems, hindering the proper implementation of rehabilitation/restoration measures. With current management still failing at enabling a proper ecological functioning of these areas (González, et al. 2017), appropriate rehabilitation/restoration practices are needed considering a multi-scale approach.

The following webinar will cover how to accurately plan riparian rehabilitation projects and develop customized rehabilitation plans targeting fauna and flora conservation and re-establishing riparian functions, in areas with limited resources, while taking into considerations the social norms and other political and economic limitations.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER Webinar: Urban Ecological Restoration in Aotearoa, New Zealand

Abstract:

Urban ecological restoration has been the focus of our New Zealand government funded research since 2005. Our most recent research program People, Cities and Nature was initiated in 2016 and concludes in 2021.The program seeks to improve the quality of life, health and economic wellbeing in New Zealand’s cities and towns through advanced understanding of urban ecology and the creation of flourishing natural environments. Multidisciplinary research is being undertaken in nine New Zealand cities via six inter-related projects: ▪ Restoration plantings ▪ Urban lizards ▪ Mammalian predators ▪ Māori restoration values ▪ Green space benefits ▪ Cross-sector alliances. While our emphasis was on the ecological science of urban biodiversity restoration at the outset, we have become increasingly involved in understanding the multiple benefits of urban ecological restoration projects including social cohesion and health and recreation benefits. This webinar will focus on the progress made in bringing indigenous nature back into Hamilton City on North Island New Zealand since the advent of two community-based initiatives the Gully Restoration Program (2000) and the establishment of Waiwhakareke Natural Heritage Park (2004). Our research has strongly underpinned the design and management of both projects and documented the many benefits they provide to the city and its people. Professor Bruce Clarkson is a restoration ecologist interested in habitat restoration to bring indigenous nature back into towns and cities based at the University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand. He leads a New Zealand Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment funded research programme: People, Cities and Nature: restoring indigenous nature in urban environments (https://www.peoplecitiesnature.co.nz/). Bruce has been a member of SER since 2005, a Director of the Australasian chapter board since 2011. He is currently chairperson of SERA and on the He is currently chairperson of SERA and on the SER Board as Regional Director for the Pacific.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Survival and early growth of 51 tropical tree species in areas degraded by artisanal gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon

Abstract:

Artisanal gold mining in Amazon forests and rivers has been reported in all Amazonian countries. Amazon mining has a wide range of negative effects and severe environmental and social consequences. Given that the activity in the region is mostly illegal, there are few studies published in the scientific literature on recovery of areas degraded by gold mining. This study conducts an experimental reforestation project aimed to evaluate soil degradation and explore the seedling survivorship and early growth of 51 tropical tree species in gold mined areas at 5 study sites distributed across the Madre de Dios region, in the Peruvian Amazon. The study provides guidance on the post-ASGM restoration potential for 51 common and useful tree species and gives practitioners recommendations for combinations of species and fertilization treatments to optimize restoration designs.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
Adequate planning and implementation of restoration

Resource Type:Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2021

SER Webinar: Seeds of Success: Fort Belknap Indian Community-BLM-SER Native Seed and Grassland Restoration Program

Abstract:

The Fort Belknap Indian Community (FBIC) Native Seed & Grassland Restoration Program was designed to meet DOI, BLM, and Plant Conservation and Restoration Program Strategic Goals, via partnerships with FBIC and the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER). Launched in 2019, and led by an Indigenous PI, this Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK)-based program focuses on developing genetically appropriate native plant material for habitat restoration; inventorying and prioritizing plant populations; and implementing and assessing restoration efforts through monitoring. Working on BLM lands, in consultation with Aaniiih and Nakoda elders and employing and empowering tribal youth, we are using Assessment, Inventorying, and Monitoring (AIM) protocols to identify plant populations, and then making collections from them for the Seeds of Success (SOS) program. Our long-term goal is to empower FBIC in creating a community-led greenhouse program to grow out native seeds, focusing on culturally significant species, thereby benefitting the community financially in increasing BLM Stock and Foundation seed amounts to use on larger programs and for restoration of FBIC and other Native American lands. FBIC has invited us to expand seed collection onto FBIC land, to help the community advance restoration efforts of degraded rangelands to support Greater sage-grouse and bison conservation.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER-WC Webinar: The Peninsula Stream Society: Headwaters to Deepwaters

Abstract:

The Peninsula Streams Society helps coordinate stream restoration and habitat conservation on the Saanich Peninsula. We provide our associated groups with the technical expertise and resources to help achieve their goals.

Our goal is to achieve healthy aquatic habitat that supports self-sustaining populations of native species in both freshwater and marine environments. We accomplish this objective through research, restoration, innovative projects, public education and private land stewardship

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER Webinar: Advances in Remote Sensing to Support Coastal Habitat Monitoring & Resiliency

Abstract:

Satellite imagery provides cost-effective and reliable information to aid in coastal restoration and resiliency efforts. Learn about Stantec’s recent pilot study on the Louisiana Barrier Islands where new innovative remote sensing technologies are being used to help our client monitor and prioritize restoration efforts in the face of climate change and natural disasters. We acquired high-resolution satellite imagery daily in optical (red, green, blue) and near-infrared (NIR) channels for the entire Barrier Island chain at a fraction of the cost of traditional aerial photos. For the past five years, Stantec, in partnership with the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) have been using Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) and Interferomic Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to establish baseline conditions for this site with incredible precision and accuracy, including vegetation health, shoreline delineation, and land changes resulting from erosion and deposition.

Speakers: Grant Wiseman (Stantec Geomatics Remote Sensing Specialist) and Carl Ferraro (Stantec Senior Environmental Scientist).
Grant’s diverse remote sensing background sets him apart from other remote sensing professionals—he’s completed studies across the globe. Grant has worked in the rainforests of central Borneo and in the Canadian high arctic, applying his remote sensing skillset on a wide variety of applications, mapping mountain gorilla habitats and delineating native American archaeology. He’s also utilized many types of remotely sensed imagery from ultraviolet light and thermal energy to synthetic aperture radar. With more than 25 years of experience working in coastal programs, Carl provides clients with the expertise needed to successfully plan coastal restoration and economic development projects. These innovative plans and designs work with natural systems, leveraging our “eco capital” to reduce impacts to coastal resources.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER-E Webinar: State of Ecological Restoration in Estonia

Abstract:

Join Aveliina Helm of the Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences at the University of Tartu, to learn about the state of ecological restoration in Estonia.

This is the fourth of a 2021 webinar series by SER Europe – every 2nd Wednesday of the month a member of SER-E will lecture us on the State of Ecological Restoration on her/his Country, followed by a Q&A and a conclusion on best practices and further research + innovation networking.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER Webinar: Kūkulu Ke Ea A Kanaloa – Restoring the Kaho’olawe Island Reserve

Abstract:

Kaho‘olawe is a single shield volcano located 7 miles southwest of the island of Maui in the Hawaiian archipelago. The island is approximately 11 miles long and 7 miles wide, encompassing roughly 28.000 acres (45 sq.mi.). Kaho‘olawe is a cultural treasure, possessing unique archeological sites that have put the entire island on the National Register of Historic Places. After the arrival of Europeans though, the island underwent a harsh evolution. The island was decimated of its natural dryland forest ecosystem from nearly 200 years of uncontrolled ungulate grazing and 50 years of use by the military for live fire training and bombing exercises.  Although a major clean-up of unexploded ordnance (UXO) was conducted between 1998 and 2003, the island and its surrounding waters are still littered with UXO.
Paul Higashino, Restoration Program Manager with the Kaho’olawe Island Reserve Commission, will be discussing the past and present restoration efforts on island, as well as future directions for the work. Paul will share the innovative and unconventional planting methods one must employ when attempting to reforest a former bombing range, where digging into the ground is impossible.  He will also discuss the use of erosion control devices, like gabions and wattles, in areas of hardpan to help slow the flow of water and minimize sedimentation in the nearby marine ecosystems.

Paul has a BS in Tropical Agriculture from The University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa. Paul has been with the KIRC since 1996 and is the Restoration Manager for the Restoration Program. He is responsible for the biological management for Kahoʻolawe and planning restoration activities on island. This includes planting, erosion control, planting strategies, faunal restoration, and logistics of KIRC personnel and volunteers. Previous work history included working for The Nature Conservancy of Hawaiʻi, Maui Preserves as Field Naturalist and Assistant Preserves Manager, Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, Research Division as a Research Associate, and many more.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

THE SECURITY THREAT THAT BINDS US: THE UNRAVELING OF ECOLOGICAL AND NATURAL SECURITY AND WHAT THE UNITED STATES CAN DO ABOUT IT

Abstract:

The Converging Risks Lab of the Council on Strategic Risks (CSR) released a landmark report, The Security Threat That Binds Us, that identifies ecological disruption as a major and underappreciated security threat and United States to reboot its national security architecture and doctrine to better respond to this evolving threat landscape. Ongoing stresses to critical Earth systems, including to water, food, wildlife, forests and fisheries, heightens the risks of future pandemics, conflict, political instability,  loss of social cohesion, economic harm, and other security outcomes.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2021

SER-RM Workshop: Practical Tools and Sample Designs for Ecological Restoration Monitoring

Abstract:

These three presentations make up SER-RM’s recent three-day workshop: Practical Tools and Sample Designs for Ecological Restoration Monitoring. On day one (May 4), Dr. Tim Robinson will lay out a path for avoiding failure in environmental monitoring related to ecosystem restoration and a framework for the necessities of a solid sampling plan. On day two (May 5), Dr. Blair Robertson will discuss the benefits of spatially balanced sampling designs for environmental resources. On day three (May 6), Mr. Sam Cox from the US Department of Interior – Bureau of Land Management – Wyoming State Office will discuss and show examples of how to use remote sensing with free, open-source software.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER Webinar: Enabling factors to scale up forest landscape restoration

Abstract:

A study of 10 long term and large scale forest restoration initiatives reveals some of the key governance and economic factors that support restoration. This WWF and IUFRO study entitled “Enabling factors to scale up forest landscape restoration: the roles of governance and economics” highlights the key factors at the national or sub-national scale that motivate the initiation of forest restoration, enable its implementation at scale and sustain it. The report features examples of how these enabling factors have played out in different countries, and finds that approaches have to be context-specific to be successful.

 

Speaker: Stephanie Mansourian has been an environmental consultant for the last 16 years and is also a research associate with Geneva University (Switzerland). Her work in the last 25 years has spanned several environmental topics, including forest restoration, environmental governance, protected areas, sustainability among others. She was at the forefront of the development of forest landscape restoration (FLR) at the time when she was managing WWF’s related programme. Since then, and based on her observations of FLR programmes and projects, she carried out her PhD specifically on governance challenges related to FLR. In her work, she takes an integrated approach and seeks to span disciplines wherever possible. As a consultant her clients include NGOs, conventions, UN agencies and foundations. Her voluntary commitments include her board membership with the Society for Ecological Restoration, and her role as deputy coordinator of the IUFRO Task Force on “Transforming forest landscapes for future climates and human well-being”. She has published three books and authored several articles in peer reviewed journals.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER-NW Inclusion in Ecological Restoration: Reimagining Restoration

Abstract:

What does inclusion in ecological restoration look like? How would it feel to truly welcome, celebrate, and protect marginalized members of our communities and ecosystems? In this ecosystem of social change, we must initiate and continue timely conversations surrounding race, gender, class, ability, ageism, and violence in the science and practice of ecological restoration. To disentangle restoration from social injustices, we are obligated to openly reflect on the racist lineage of conservation, uncover mutual interests in solidarity efforts, explore our own racial development, commit to training about implicit bias and interrogate how our institutions collude with BIPOC erasure, heteropatriarchy and extractive capitalism. Implications for Practice include decolonizing our media consumption/presentation, shifting language, mapping our roles in social change, evaluating people’s access to restoration benefits, and elevating untold stories. Michael Yadrick (CERP) endeavors to revive forest ecosystems and our relationship with nature in a warming world.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program