Resource Database

©Danilo Lima, Agripalm Ambiental

The RRC database contains a wide variety of resources and publications related to ecological restoration, and we are actively working to expand this collection. It is our aim to serve as the principal clearinghouse for information and tools to support the work of researchers, practitioners, land managers, educators, students, and anyone else interested in restoration. Use the filter tool below to search the database by title, author, resource type, keyword, or any combination of these factors.

Although SER does review all entries in the database for relevance and quality, these resources have not been rigorously reviewed or extensively vetted in every case, and SER therefore makes no claim as to their accuracy or accordance with generally accepted principles in the field. The database is provided as a resource for visitors to the SER website, and it is ultimately left to the individual user to make their own determinations about the quality and veracity of a given publication or resource.

If there is a resource we missed, please let us know! We are interested in current books, articles, technical documents, videos, and other resources that are directly relevant to ecological restoration science, practice or policy, as well as resources treating the social, cultural and economic dimensions of restoration.

Publication Year:
Resource Type
Keyword
Title
Author

 

Celebrating 25 Years of Action for Biodiversity

In celebration of the International Day for Biological Diversity on 22 May 2018, Wiley has put together a special collection of over 100 research articles from 12 journals highlighting important contributions to advancing the understanding, protection, and preservation of biodiversity. Articles come from numerous fields in the natural and social sciences. They are free to share, read and download for a limited time.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: various

Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetic Resources

The Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetics Resources (RNGR) website is a popular resource for those who grow or outplant native plants for reforestation, restoration, or conservation. The site hosts a national directory of forestry and conservation nurseries, a calendar of relevant events, and access to a repository of approximately 15,000 articles  (searchable and free to download). The site also includes pages specific to tropical plants, tribal nurseries, and seed.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing

Roadside revegetation: An integrated approach to establishing native plants and pollinator habitat

The roadsides of the United States play an important role in the conservation of declining wild pollinators and in supporting the health of managed pollinators. The An Integrated Approach to Establishing Native Plants and Pollinator Habitat program provides current best practices for planning, designing, and implementing a revegetation project that will also create habitat for pollinators. The web resource offers a comprehensive Roadside Revegetation Report detailing the complete roadside revegetation process, from project initiation, through monitoring and management. It is also home to the Ecoregional Revegetation Application online tool and a Roadside Revegetation online library.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing

US Army Corps of Engineers Ecosystem Restoration Gateway

Ecosystem Restoration is one of the primary missions of the Civil Works program. The purpose of Civil Works ecosystem restoration activities is to restore significant ecosystem function, structure, and dynamic processes that have been degraded. Ecosystem restoration efforts involve a comprehensive examination of the problems contributing to the system degradation, and the development of alternative means for their solution. The intent of restoration is to partially or fully reestablish the attributes of a naturalistic, functioning, and self-regulating system.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: N/A

US Army Corps of Engineers Management Measures Digital Library

The purpose of this site is to identify and describe examples of selected ecosystem engineering features or management measures and their components. This site is not intended to be a design manual, but rather to provide sufficient information to stimulate plan formulation and assist planners in identifying what’s out there and to “visualize” how a management measure or engineering feature may be applicable to their project.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: N/A

Ecological Management & Restoration (EMR) Project Summaries

The Australasian journal Ecological Management & Restoration (EMR) is open to submission of short summaries (or groups of linked summaries) of 300-700 words on any interesting ecosystem rehabilitation or restoration project in Australia that is already showing good or promising results. These project summaries are published on an open-access website managed by the journal’s editorial team. They are not a peer-reviewed manuscript type in EMR, but are checked for clarity and content by the project summaries editor.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: N/A

Restoration Evidence

Restoration Evidence is a free resource that aims to make ecological restoration more effective by providing evidence on which restoration actions work, and which don’t. The searchable website contains summaries of scientific research on the effects of actions to restore habitats, in order to support decision making.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: launched in 2018

Rate of forest recovery after fire exclusion on anthropogenic savannas in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Deforestation in the tropics is often followed by the creation of anthropogenic savannas used for animal husbandry. By discontinuing burning regimes, forests may recolonize the savanna and carbon stocksmay recover. However, little is known about the success and speed of tropical forest recovery, while such information is vital for a better quantification of efforts to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) as well as supporting Forest LandscapeRestoration (FLR) practices. Therefore, we designed a forest regeneration experiment within a savanna patch in the Mayombe hills(Democratic Republic of Congo), by discontinuing the annual burning regime in an 88 ha exclosure since 2005. 101 permanent inventory plots (40.4 ha) were installed in 2010 and remeasured in 2014. Tree species were classified as savanna or forest specialists. We estimate a forest specialist encroachment rate of 9 stems ha−1 yr−1 and a savanna specialist disappearance rate of 16 stems ha−1 yr−1. Average diameter of forest specialists did not change due to an increasing influx of recruits, while average diameter of savanna trees increased due to decreasing recruitment. Carbon stored by forest specialists increased from 3.12 to 5.60 Mg C ha−1, suggesting a forest carbon recovery rate of 0.62 Mg C ha−1 yr−1. Using the average carbon stock of 19 nearby mature rainforestplots as a reference, we estimate a total forest carbon recovery time of at least 150 years. The Manzonzi exclosure may potentially become an important reference experiment to quantify REDD+ schemes in Central Africa. Furthermore, this natural regeneration experiment demonstrates how carbon sequestration and biodiversity conservation can go hand-in-hand. However, more censuses are needed to better quantify the long-term carbon recovery trajectory within the protected area.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2019

Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions. Part 2. Management applications

The Science Framework is intended to link the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy with long-term strategic conservation and restoration actions in the sagebrush biome. The focus is on sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems and sagebrush dependent species with an emphasis on Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). Part 1 of the Science Framework, published in 2017, provides the scientific information and decision-support tools for prioritizing areas for management and determining effective management strategies across the sagebrush biome. Part 2, this document, provides the management considerations for applying the information and tools in Part 1. Part 2 is intended to facilitate implementation of resource management priorities and use of management strategies that increase ecosystem resilience to disturbance and resistance to nonnative invasive annual grasses. The target audience of Part 2 is field managers, resource specialists, and regional and national-level managers. The topics addressed in this volume include adaptive management and monitoring, climate adaptation, wildfire and vegetation management, nonnative invasive plant management, application of National Seed Strategy concepts, livestock grazing management, wild horse and burro considerations, and integration and tradeoffs. Geospatial data, maps, and models for the Science Framework are provided through the U.S. Geological Survey’s ScienceBase database and Bureau of Land Management’s Landscape Approach Data Portal. The Science Framework is intended to be adaptive and will be updated as additional data become available on other values and species at risk. It is anticipated that the Science Framework will be widely used to: (1) inform emerging strategies to conserve sagebrush ecosystems, sagebrush dependent species, and human uses of the sagebrush system; and (2) assist managers in prioritizing and planning on-the-ground restoration and mitigation actions across the sagebrush biome.

Resource Type: Technical Document
Publication Date: 2019

Plant Biology Special Issue: Natural Capital from Native Seeds

The papers in this Special Issue are broadly clustered around the following topics: technical advances, seed quality for restoration, methods to improve seed germination in dormant seed lots, demands imposed by changing environmental conditions, and the role of national policies in the use of native seed.

Resource Type: Journal Special Issue
Publication Date: 2019

Using naturally occurring climate resilient corals to construct bleaching-resistant nurseries

Ecological restoration of forests, meadows, reefs, or other foundational ecosystems during climate change depends on the discovery and use of individuals able to withstand future conditions. For coral reefs, climate-tolerant corals might not remain tolerant in different environments because of widespread environmental adjustment of coral physiology and symbionts. Here, we test if parent corals retain their heat tolerance in nursery settings, if simple proxies predict successful colonies, and if heat-tolerant corals suffer lower growth or survival in normal settings. Before the 2015 natural bleaching event in American Samoa, we set out 800 coral fragments from 80 colonies of four species selected by prior tests to have a range of intraspecific natural heat tolerance. After the event, nursery stock from heat-tolerant parents showed two to three times less bleaching across species than nursery stock from less tolerant parents. They also retained higher individual genetic diversity through the bleaching event than did less heat-tolerant corals. The three best proxies for thermal tolerance were response to experimental heat stress, location on the reef, and thermal microclimate. Molecular biomarkers were also predictive but were highly species specific. Colony genotype and symbiont genus played a similarly strong role in predicting bleaching. Combined, our results show that selecting for host and symbiont resilience produced a multispecies coral nursery that withstood multiple bleaching events, that proxies for thermal tolerance in restoration can work across species and be inexpensive, and that different coral clones within species reacted very differently to bleaching.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2019

Adapting land restoration to a changing climate: Embracing the knowns and unknowns

Even if bold efforts to curb climate change materialize, people will still need to adapt to the changes that have already happened, and these are projected to intensify in the future. And land restoration should be envisioned in this context; one of change and unpredictability, and the need to adapt. In this brief, we discuss the knowns and unknowns about land restoration and societal adaptation under climate change. We include a list of questions that can help navigate the knowns and unknowns related to land restoration and people’s adaptation in particular contexts.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2019

There is hope for achieving ambitious Atlantic Forest restoration commitments

Achieving ambitious global restoration commitments is a huge challenge. The Atlantic Forest Restoration Pact, created in 2009 as a movement to restore 15 Mha of degraded/deforested lands by 2050, pledged 1 Mha towards the 2020 Bonn Challenge. We documented the restoration of an estimated 673,510–740,555 ha of native forests from 2011 to 2015 in the Atlantic Forest, and expect that a total of 1.35–1.48 Mha will be under recovery by 2020. The Pact is one of the first Brazilian restoration initiatives to monitor an international restoration commitment and to demonstrate that ambitious targets can be reached. Part of this success in large-scale restoration is related to three main Pact activities: (i) development of restoration governance, communication and articulation; (ii) promotion of strategies to influence public policies; and (iii) establishment of restoration monitoring systems. The experience and lessons learned by the Pact could inspire and inform other restoration initiatives worldwide.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2019

Students & Emerging Professionals

SER has launched a new membership category for Students and Emerging Professionals (SEP). SER recognizes that this group of individuals is vital to promoting the science and practice of ecological restoration, connecting newcomers with established leaders in the field, and integrating new ideas with accepted restoration practices. SER hopes that membership in the SEP category will foster communication and collaboration among individuals within the organization and provide the tools and knowledge needed for students to successfully enter careers in Ecological Restoration. SER has developed an SEP committee to promote these efforts. During this webinar, SER board members and staff will discuss resources available to SER SEP members including virtual discussion boards, the job board, and the Restoration Resource Center as well as ways by which interested SER members can become involved with the SEP committee.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2019

Demystifying the CERP Application Process

Join SER’s Certification Program Coordinator Jen Lyndall to learn about the CERP program application process including the top 5 most frequently asked questions by applicants.

Resource Type:
Publication Date: 2019

Connecting Science & People

Community members are often instrumental to the success (or the delay) of science-based projects yet are sometimes considered late in the project timeline. Dive into the complexities of communications planning, “public” awareness, and collaboration with partners with Samara Group, an Oregon-based consulting firm that specializes in complex science-based communications and community engagement.

Supplemental references can be found here: https://www.samarapdx.com/blog/2018/11/13/connecting-science-and-people

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2019

The Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Chapter 2019 Graduate Student Colloquia: Day 1

Assessing the effects of meadow restoration on Sierra Nevada amphibians using eDNA (Nicolette Nelson)

Managers in the Sierra Nevada are increasingly restoring degraded wet meadows in order to recover essential ecosystem services (e.g. water storage and carbon sequestration) and to benefit native wildlife. These projects may increase available habitat for federally-listed amphibians, but some projects have unintentionally prompted the spread of invasive species that negatively impact native amphibians through predation, competition, and disease. Rare amphibians, early-stage invasive colonizers, and pathogens are difficult to observe using traditional survey methods, so we used environmental DNA (eDNA) to determine the net impacts of wet meadow restoration on sensitive amphibians. Our results suggest that wet meadow restoration in the Sierra Nevada has not directly benefited sensitive amphibians.

Use of Museum Material to Reconstruct the Extirpated Fauna of the Los Angeles River (Rachel Turba de Paula)

After extirpation of species in their natural habitat, museum samples are usually the only potential source of DNA. For restoration plans to be successful, we need to clearly understand what has been lost. Museum material stored at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County will be used to investigate extirpated populations of unarmored threespine stickleback, a species of freshwater unionid clam, as well as an extinct and endemic species of shrimp. In this chapter, we will investigate the success of different protocols on extractions of formalin-fixed material, dried tissues and shells, which can secondarily be extended to a hybridization capture approach for genome sequencing. Results will be used to answer questions about relationships between extant and extirpated populations and should clarify options for appropriate restoration of the Los Angeles Basin.

Resource Type:
Publication Date: 2019

The Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Chapter 2019 Graduate Student Colloquia: Day 2

Community Science for the 21st century, a tool of Environmental Justice (Emma MacDonald).

Emma MacDonald is currently a graduate student within IslandWood and Antioch University’s Urban Environmental Education program. This program is a novel approach to traditional Environmental Education pedagogy, emphasizing environmental leadership, social justice, and expanding place-based experiential learning to include the built environments of our cities. Emma has a background in conservation research and ecological restoration through several positions across Oregon, Washington, and Hawaii. Emma’s webinar presentation will focus on utilizing community science (formerly known as citizen science) as a tool for the environmental justice movement; mobilizing communities to become involved with all aspects of planning, research, and implementation of results to effect positive and sustainable change. 

Resource Type:
Publication Date: 2019

The Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Chapter 2019 Graduate Student Colloquia: Day 3

1) Variation in perceptions of the stormwater social-ecological system in Puget Sound: insights for management across the land-sea interface (Caitlyn O’Connor)

I will investigate the perceptions of the impacts of non-point source pollution (stormwater) on the marine ecosystem in Puget Sound, Washington by eliciting regional expert opinions’ in the stormwater science and management realm. Specifically, my objectives are to: 1) Describe variation in the ways stormwater experts perceive the structure of the Puget Sound stormwater social-social ecological system. 2) Explore the consequences of differences in variation in perceptions in the stormwater social-social ecological system for management. 3) Develop a consensus model of the Puget Sound stormwater social-ecological system that can be used to support management decisions. These objectives build off one another to end with a tool that will hopefully enhance our understanding of the impacts of emerging contaminants (stormwater), improve our knowledge of the transport of pollutants in the Puget Sound ecosystem, and preliminarily evaluate the perception of how much recovery needs to happen.

2) How can Floodplain Restoration Enhance Streamflow and Salmon Habitat in the Stillaguamish River? (Ashley Bagley)

This project builds upon the Stillaguamish Tribe’s traditional knowledge and collaborations with Snohomish County to predict where floodplain restoration can provide the greatest increase in salmonid habitat by amplifying groundwater-surface water exchange. Our study includes five areas within the North and South Forks had warmer temperatures than side channels and tributaries. Further statistical analysis is needed to identify specific reaches that would create the most beneficial salmonid habitat. The Stillaguamish Tribe and Snohomish County will be able to use the study results for future hydrologic modeling of groundwater-surface water interactions using collected water quality data, and in the evaluation of large wood installations planned for 2019. 

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2019

How can we map ecological restoration onto a rapidly changing world?

Don Falk, SER’s first Executive Director and expert in fire and restoration ecology, discusses the future of restoration ecological in the face of climate change.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2019

The Nature Conservancy Water Funds Toolbox

Water Funds are organizations that take collective action to help address water insecurity. They design and enhance financial and governance mechanisms which unite public, private and civil society stakeholders around a common goal to contribute to water security through nature-based solutions and sustainable watershed management. This toolbox has been developed by Water Funds experts to help leaders succeed in developing Water Funds. This web-based toolbox has a variety of resources including a step-by-step guide, a curriculum, and access to a global community of Water Funds.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2019

Cascading impacts of large-carnivore extirpation in an African ecosystem

The world’s largest carnivores are declining and now occupy mere fractions of their historical ranges. Theory predicts that when apex predators disappear, large herbivores should become less fearful, occupy new habitats, and modify those habitats by eating new food plants. Yet experimental support for this prediction has been difficult to obtain in large-mammal systems. Following the extirpation of leopards and African wild dogs from Mozambique’s Gorongosa National Park, forest-dwelling antelopes (bushbuck, Tragelaphus sylvaticus) expanded into treeless floodplains, where they consumed novel diets and suppressed a common food plant (waterwort, Bergia mossambicensis). By experimentally simulating predation risk, we demonstrate that this behavior was reversible. Thus, whereas anthropogenic predator extinction disrupted a trophic cascade by enabling rapid differentiation of prey behavior, carnivore restoration may just as rapidly reestablish that cascade.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2019

Ecological restoration law: concepts and case studies

Ecological restoration is as essential as sustainable development for the health of the biosphere. Restoration, however, has been a low priority of most countries’ environmental laws, which tend to focus narrowly on rehabilitation of small, discrete sites rather than the more ambitious recovery of entire ecosystems and landscapes. Through critical theoretical perspectives and topical case studies, this book’s diverse contributors explore a more ambitious agenda for ecological restoration law. Not only do they investigate current laws and other governance mechanisms; they also consider the philosophical and methodological bases for the law to take ecological restoration more seriously. Through exploration of themes relating to time, space, geography, semiotics, social justice, and scientific knowledge, this book offers innovative and critical insights into ecological restoration law.

Resource Type: Book
Publication Date: 2019

Addressing Water Scarcity through Restoration

Join Louise Stafford of The Nature Conservancy and John Owino of IUCN for a discussion of restoration efforts to ensure water security, in South Africa and East Africa. Moderated by Craig Beatty of IUCN and SER’s Large-Scale Ecosystem Restoration section.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2019

Native Plant Conservation Campaign ecosystem services online portal

This online resource provides information about the ecosystem services supplied by native plant communities to human societies and economies. The goal is to provide tools to help individuals and organizations more easily and effectively demonstrate the importance (including but not limited to economic value) of native plant conservation.
Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2019

A diagnostic for collaborative monitoring in forest landscape restoration

Forest landscape restoration (FLR) requires a long-term commitment from a range of stakeholders to plan the restoration initiative collaboratively and see it through successfully. This is only possible when the people involved – whether they are landholders, indigenous groups, government entities, non-governmental organizations or other crucial actors – come together to define common goals and monitor progress toward those goals. Collaborative monitoring can play a crucial role in these processes by providing a structured way to include diverse stakeholders in FLR, generate local buy-in and catalyze social learning. However, collaborative monitoring is new to many FLR planners and, while they may be interested in implementing collaborative monitoring, they may not know where to start. This diagnostic provides a systematic way for FLR planners to assess their FLR initiatives against a checklist of success factors. The diagnostic helps practitioners to: (1) determine whether they are ready for collaborative monitoring; (2) identify what elements need to strengthened; and (3) assess whether existing monitoring systems are on the right track. The diagnostic can be applied on at least two scales: it includes factors to be used at a specific FLR site and it outlines the factors that are intrinsic to a multi-level collaborative monitoring system. It consists of a core matrix of 42 success factors, plus suggestions for performing the assessment.

Resource Type: Technical Document
Publication Date: 2019

Forest and landscape restoration dataset

Large areas worldwide have been deforested or degraded with a resulting loss of fertile soils, biodiversity and carbon stock. Deforestation and land degradation threaten the livelihoods, well-being, and resilience of millions of people around the world. Restoration of degraded lands is included as one of the Sustainable Development Goals (Goal 15), and multiple international and regional initiatives have been set up in the last few years (Bonn Challenge, 20×20 initiative). This theme focuses on mapping and characterizing restoration initiatives.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2019

Low-tech process based restoration of riverscapes design manual

The purpose of this design manual is to provide restoration practitioners with guidelines for implementing a subset of low-tech tools—namely beaver dam analogues (BDAs) and post-assisted log structures (PALS)—for initiating process-based restoration in structurally-starved riverscapes. While the concept of process-based restoration in riverscapes has been advocated for at least two decades, details and specific examples on how to implement it remain sparse. Here, we describe ‘low-tech process-based restoration’ (LT-PBR) as a practice of using simple, low unit-cost, structural additions (e.g. wood and beaver dams) to riverscapes to mimic functions and initiate specific processes. Hallmarks of this approach include:

  • An explicit focus on the processes that a low-tech restoration intervention is meant to promote
  • A conscious effort to use cost-effective, low-tech treatments (e.g. hand-built, natural materials, non-engineered, short-term design life-spans) because of the need to efficiently scale-up application.
  • ‘Letting the system do the work’ which defers critical decision making to riverscapes and nature’s ecosystem engineers
Resource Type: Technical Document
Publication Date: 2019

GIS-based Vulnerability Assessment of Upland Forests in the Cedar River Waters

Presented by SERNW and Rolf Gersonde. Climate change presents new challenges for ecological restoration. The recovery of ecological functions, either through reducing disturbance or by actively promoting ecosystem development is put into question as climate change is likely to alter ecosystem development and composition with uncertain outcome for ecological functions. In the diverse landscape of the Cascade Range, climate impacts are going to vary depending on topography and ecosystem composition. While exposed sites are likely to experience stronger climate impacts and have greater uncertainty regarding ecosystem recovery, other sites (climate refugia) are likely to be less impacted or will be altered more slowly. To aid forest and aquatic restoration at the landscape scale in the Cedar River Municipal Watershed, we conducted a vulnerability analysis of ecosystems to guide ecological restoration efforts at the landscape scale and adapt to projected climate change. We identified elements of climate exposure and ecosystem sensitivity that could be spatially represented and scaled. The elements were combined in an additive model to result in a landscape representation of climate vulnerability. Adding a spatial filter of areas where climate impacts would have greater effect on management goals and adding operational constraints enabled us to identify priority areas for conservation measures to restore late-successional forest habitat and ecosystem resilience. This approach could be adapted to other landscapes and management goals and offers managers a tool to prioritize restoration efforts in an uncertain future.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Soil Bioengineering for the Restoration of Steep and Unstable Slopes and Riparian Areas

Presented by Dave Polster and SER Northwest. Soil bioengineering is the use of living plant materials to perform some engineering function. In some cases, other materials are included. Soil bioengineering systems can be used to treat steep slopes and to provide stability to unstable sites. Soil bioengineering treatments use pioneering species that initiate the natural successional processes associated with the region in which they are applied. This means that in the long run, soil bioengineering systems promote the successional movement of the ecosystem towards later successional stages.

Soil bioengineering systems can be used to stabilize sites that conventional systems would cost millions of dollars to stabilize. In addition, since the soil bioengineering systems promote the natural successional development of the site, there is a long term recovery of the site that does not occur with traditional treatments. In addition unlike traditional treatments, soil bioengineering systems promote the sequestration of Carbon thus help with the current climate crisis.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018