Resource Database

©Danilo Lima, Agripalm Ambiental

The RRC database contains a wide variety of resources and publications related to ecological restoration, and we are actively working to expand this collection. It is our aim to serve as the principal clearinghouse for information and tools to support the work of researchers, practitioners, land managers, educators, students, and anyone else interested in restoration. Use the filter tool below to search the database by title, author, resource type, keyword, or any combination of these factors.

Although SER does review all entries in the database for relevance and quality, these resources have not been rigorously reviewed or extensively vetted in every case, and SER therefore makes no claim as to their accuracy or accordance with generally accepted principles in the field. The database is provided as a resource for visitors to the SER website, and it is ultimately left to the individual user to make their own determinations about the quality and veracity of a given publication or resource.

If there is a resource we missed, please let us know! We are interested in current books, articles, technical documents, videos, and other resources that are directly relevant to ecological restoration science, practice or policy, as well as resources treating the social, cultural and economic dimensions of restoration.

Publication Year:
Resource Type
Keyword
Title
Author

 

Building a Business Case for Marine Ecosystem Restoration

Abstract:

This webinar series, focussed on marine ecosystem restoration, provides fresh perspectives on how we can benefit from better planning for a healthy marine environment. The fourth webinar will focus on two important topics: Dr Richard Unsworth, Seagrass Ecosystems Research Group, University of Swansea, Wales. The importance of restoring seagrass meadows for global fisheries production Prof Per-Olav Moksnes, Department of Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Seagrass loss and restoration – implications for the value of carbon and nitrogen stocks

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020

The Short Term Action Plan on Ecosystem Restoration of the UN CBD

Abstract:

The UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), adopted at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992, is the main global agreement regarding biodiversity, with near-universal membership. Its provisions are implemented at the national level, following 10-year plans and targets to achieve the 2050 Vision of “Living in Harmony with Nature”. At their 13th Conference in 2016, the parties to the CBD adopted the Short Term Action Plan on Ecosystem Restoration (STAPER), a flexible framework of 24 steps for the implementation of ecosystem restoration at the national scale. Last year, in partnership with SER and thanks to the financial support from the Korea Forest Service, the Secretariat of the CBD launched the “STAPER Companion”, a publication and webpage that presents a synthesis of knowledge and policy from restoration science in support of the activities of the plan. The Companion also includes a selection of resources and tools that can be useful in the implementation of these activities, presented through SER’s Restoration Resource Center. This webinar provides further detail of the context of restoration under the CBD, an overview of the activities of the STAPER and explain how to access and submit relevant resources on the companion webpage for each of these activities.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER Webinar: Invader impact on soil ecosystems – what every restoration practitioner should know

Abstract:

Plant invasions cause dramatic shifts in plant communities and ecosystem processes. While these changes are obvious aboveground, less is known about changes belowground.  Focusing on the most significant invaders in our area in the Intermountain West of the United States, this seminar will highlight how spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe), leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula), cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and sulfur cinquefoil (Potentilla recta) alter soil microbial communities and nutrient cycles, and what the consequences of these shifts might be for restoration.

Speaker: Dr. Ylva Lekberg is a soil ecologist at MPG Ranch and an adjunct professor at University of Montana. Her research focuses on structural and functional shifts in soil ecosystems associated with plant invasions, and how these changes may affect restoration success. Prior to her work in invasion biology, Ylva explored the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in subsistence farmers’ fields in Sub-Saharan Africa, coastal grasslands in Denmark and geothermal areas in Yellowstone.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

A Manager’s Guide to Coral Reef Restoration and Planning

Abstract:

A Manager’s Guide to Coral Reef Restoration Planning and Design supports the needs of reef managers seeking to begin restoration or assess their current restoration program. The Guide is aimed at reef resource managers and conservationists, along with everyone who plans, implements, and monitors restoration activities.

Through a six-step, adaptive management planning process, the Guide helps managers gather relevant data, ask critical questions, and have important conversations about restoration in their location. The process set out in the Guide leads to the creation of a Restoration Action Plan. Hallmarks of the process include the iterative nature of the planning cycle and ways to consider climate change, such that we learn and improve restoration efforts that can also meet long-term goals in a warming world. The first four steps of the Guide’s planning cycle focus on goal-based planning and design of restoration interventions. The final two steps discuss considerations for full-scale implementation and long-term monitoring.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2020

Prairie Reconstruction: Seed Mix Design and First Year Management

Abstract:

There is an emerging role for large ag conservation programs (CRP) to address more complex ecological issues using native vegetation, but resources to implement these programs are increasingly constrained. How can conservation programs achieve greater impact with limited resources, and what ecological benefits are provided per unit project cost? In this talk, we explore how seed mix design and establishment management influence cost-effectiveness and the provision of ecological benefits. Using results from a field experiment in Iowa, we show how balancing grass-to-forb ratio in seed mixes can promote multifunctionality and cost-effectiveness in prairie reconstructions, and how repeated first year mowing accelerates the provision of ecological benefits.

Justin Meissen leads the Research and Restoration Program at the Tallgrass Prairie Center.  Justin’s focus is on implementing restoration research and demonstration projects, developing training seminars, and developing technical materials. He has a PhD in Conservation Biology from the University of Minnesota and a BS in Integrative Biology from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. Justin has worked professionally in restoration ecology and botany from North Carolina to California with The Nature Conservancy, The Audubon Society, and other non-profits and environmental contractors. His past work evaluated the risks of repeated, intensive seed harvest from native tallgrass prairies to supply large-scale prairie restoration. Justin’s current research interests concentrate on issues of increasing cost-effectiveness and outcome certainty in prairie reconstructions.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

EcoRestore Portal

Abstract:

The new portal is a ‘one-stop-shop’ for all things ecological restoration that should be useful to anyone in Arizona who is interested in native gardening, ecological restoration and vegetation management in general.

In addition to general information about best management practices for restoration in Arizona, the portal supports a survey tool that allows a user to develop a list of candidate restoration species based on management goals and habitat characteristics. We hope this tool provides assistance in creating restoration designs that enhance achievement of management goals.

The website creator (Elise Gornish, egornish@email.arizona.edu) is happy to provide a zoom presentation to you and your stakeholders on the functionality of the website.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2020

Webinar: Why Get Certified?

Abstract:

Why get certified?  How will it benefit you?  Current Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioners Nick Wildman, Paul Davis, Meghan Fellows, and Keith MacCallum joined SER’s Certification Program Coordinator, Jen Lyndall, to talk about why they decided to get certified and what the benefits of certification have been.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER Webinar: Contributions of Indigenous Peoples and local communities to ecological restoration

Abstract:

Dr. Pamela McElwee presents on one of the key findings of the 2019 Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) Global Assessment – that Indigenous Peoples and local communities (IPLC) are a crucial component of environmental management. She also discusses the review of this assessment, where the roles and relationships of IPLCs and ecosystem restoration are further illustrated. The review also provides examples of how Indigenous and Local Knowledge can be incorporated in the planning, execution, and monitoring of restoration activities.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Rocky Mountain actinorhizal plants: their importance for post-fire recovery and restoration

Abstract:

Actinorhizal plants are a diverse group that form a symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing Frankia bacteria. Actinorhizal plants in the Rocky Mountains are among the most important browse species for wildlife in the region owing to their high protein content resulting from an abundant supply of nitrogen. They play critical roles in soil development and succession following fires. This webinar, presented by Mark Paschke, will focus on the ecology of Rocky Mountain actinorhizal plants in post-fire environments and their potential for expanded use in ecological restoration of burned areas.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Small Dam Removal: Lessons Learned from 20 Years of Dam Removal in Massachusetts

Abstract:

Regulations and funding sources for river restoration vary considerably across each of the 50 United States of America.  In Massachusetts, a state with over 3,000 dams, dam removal has been employed as a means to restore riverine ecological processes and eliminate public safety liabilities since around 1999. Over the last 20 years, more than 60 dams have been removed in the state with approximately 50 of those involving the state’s Division of Ecological Restoration. This presentation will describe the evolution of the practice of dam removal in Massachusetts including lessons learned, ecological and community benefits realized, and the goals and challenges for expanding the practice in the future.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER Webinar: Thornforest Restoration Along the Lower Rio Grande

Abstract:

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) South Texas National Wildlife Refuge Complex facilitates conservation within the subtropical 4-county delta of the Rio Grande River, adjacent to northeastern Mexico. Habitat restoration is a key component for conservation here as land conversion to agriculture and urban development has led to more than 90% of the region’s natural cover being lost in the past century. Historically, much of this cover was a species-diverse Tamaulipan thornforest and most of the region’s remaining mature forest fragments are now under the stewardship of public agencies like USFWS. In order to re-establish connectivity between these fragments USFWS began a sustained effort at thornforest restoration on adjacent croplands in the 1980’s. As restoration has continued over the past 40 years approaches have been modified, particularly to meet objectives relating to federally listed endangered species (e.g., ocelot, Leopardus pardalis) recovery. Over time, the restoration program’s efforts have yielded a strong support network of partners and a foundation on which different restoration methodologies have been tested. More recently, concerns over how well restoration syncs with regional climate change projections have underscored the need to develop methodologies that will facilitate resilience in the thornforest ecosystem. To this end, USFWS and American Forests have partnered since 2018 to develop a “drought resilience” strategy that includes development of modified planting designs. This collaboration has now produced a pilot restoration project that will serve as the basis for ongoing adaptation and evaluation of this new strategy. We are hopeful that these efforts will provide some long-term answers for conservation within the Rio Grande delta landscape.

Speakers: 

Kimberly-Wahl Villarreal is the plant ecologist for the South Texas National Wildlife Refuge Complex (STRC) headquartered in Alamo, Texas. She manages thornforest restoration projects across the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildife Refuge and Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, including a Fish and Wildlife Service operated native plant nursery. In addition, she addresses issues facing federally endangered plants in the borderland region and invasive species management across the STRC.

Jon Dale is American Forests’ senior manager for forest restoration in Texas’ Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) and is the chair of the Thornforest Conservation Partnership, a coalition of agency, non-profit, research and industry stakeholders working toward a unified goal of biodiversity conservation in the LRGV’s 4-county area. Jon has 20 years of experience in planning and implementing ecological restoration and natural resource monitoring projects throughout Texas, the US and the neotropics, while working with a wide range of conservation-based and agricultural non-profits, agencies, universities and environmental consulting firms.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Webinar: Primer of Ecological Restoration

Abstract:

Dr. Karen Holl will discuss her new “Primer of Ecological Restoration” and associated online teaching resources. In twelve brief chapters, the book introduces readers to the basics of restoration project planning, monitoring, implementation, and adaptive management, as well as ecological principles to guide ecosystem recovery. Dr. Holl will give an overview of the book and discuss how the book could be used as part of full-length or short courses on restoration ecology or serve as a jumping off point for new practitioners in the field.

Karen Holl is a Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research focuses on understanding how local and landscape scale processes affect ecosystem recovery from human disturbance and using this information to restore rain forests in Latin America and chaparral, grassland and riparian systems in California. She has taught a course in restoration ecology for over 20 years and advises numerous land management and conservation organizations in California and internationally on ecological restoration. She was selected as the 2017 co-winner of the Theodore Sperry Award of the Society for Ecological Restoration and is currently the faculty director of the Kenneth S. Norris Center for Natural History at UCSC Santa Cruz.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Webinar: Training design, data type, and data reliability in citizen science

Abstract:

The work of citizen scientists expands the data collection possibilities in natural resource management.  The problem is that some scientists and land managers view the data collected by citizen scientists as unreliable. To investigate the potential correlation between training and data reliability in citizen science, the researcher assessed 22 citizen science programs around the world. These data indicated alignment between citizen science training, andragogy, and social learning theory. Also revealed was a bimodal distribution of citizen science programs that related data collection type and training design across the general categorizations of citizen science engagement. Quantitative data analyses supported the assessment of data reliability when citizen scientists collected water quality or photographic data. Terrestrial data collected lacked quantitative assessment and was therefore more difficult to validate. Few citizen science programs illustrated principles of backwards design. The implementation of training assessment to validate citizen scientist learning gains may promote data reliability in citizen science.

Presenter Bio:

Dr. Maggie Gaddis teaches biology at the University of Colorado – Colorado Springs. She is also a member of the Bard College Citizen Science faculty.  Her research involves ecological restoration monitoring in southern Colorado and citizen science. In the education realm, Maggie investigates the efficacy of training for citizen scientists. In the science realm, she investigates the ecological success of restoration efforts in public lands.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Webinar: Where road ecology and ecological restoration converge

Abstract:

Road ecology has made substantial advances over the last few decades. Our knowledge has increased and mitigation measures to reduce the impacts of roads and traffic on wildlife are now widespread and implemented regularly. In many cases, the mitigation measures address human safety through reducing collisions with large mammals, provide safe crossing opportunities for wildlife, and it can even make economic sense to implement these mitigation measures. These successes may be reason to celebrate, but it may also be time for us to think about whether we are missing something, where we need to do a better job. While road projects are typically linear in nature, the needs of wildlife need to be addressed based on a landscape level approach. Crossing structures for wildlife are no good if there is no suitable wildlife habitat nearby. In some cases, this means protecting existing habitat patches close to wildlife crossing opportunities. In other cases, it may mean restoring habitat close to highways or creating suitable corridors between habitat patches and safe crossing opportunities. And while the focus of many highway mitigation measures is with the movements of large wild mammals, we also need to address the needs of smaller species that may not be able to move over long distances. For these species we need food, water, and cover every step of the way as it may take them days or weeks to cross to the other side of the road. In other words, we need a shift from providing safe crossing opportunities for large mammals to restoring habitat connectivity for a wide range of species groups and perhaps even allowing physical ecosystem processes to continue between the two sides of a highway. In summary, road ecology cannot be effective without applying the principles of restoration ecology and landscape ecology. And if habitat restoration is to succeed on a landscape level, restoration and landscape ecology can benefit from road ecology.

 

 
Speaker bio: Dr. Marcel Huijser received his MSc in population ecology (1992) and his PhD. in road ecology (2000) at Wageningen University in The Netherlands. He studied plant-herbivore interactions in wetlands for the Dutch Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management (1992-1995), hedgehog traffic victims and mitigation strategies in an anthropogenic landscape for the Dutch Society for the Study and Conservation of Mammals (1995-1999), and multi-functional land use issues on agricultural lands for the Research Institute for Animal Husbandry at Wageningen University and Research Centre (1999-2002). Since 2002, Marcel works on wildlife-transportation issues for the Western Transportation Institute at Montana State University. Finally, Marcel is a visiting professor at the University of São Paulo in Brazil where he has been teaching road ecology on a regular basis since 2014.
Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Community Restoration in Utqiaġvik, AK

Abstract:

The North Slope Borough of Alaska is nearly the size of Michigan and is classified almost entirely as wetlands, giving “wetland enhancement” a new meaning. Located at the northern-most latitude in the United States, the Native village Utqiaġvik (formerly Barrow) is entirely surrounded by wetlands. The wet permafrost landscape, the mosquitoes it hosts, and the polar bears that occasionally wander onto land, challenge even the most intrepid traveler. The Iñupiaq people have a history of traveling far to camp in the summer to gather fish and wild plants to store for the long winter, but this tradition was mostly lost following the oil boom in the region and a switch to a cash economy. While generations of Iñupiat have subsisted on a diet of mostly meat and fat, plants have always played a special role, though in much smaller quantities than animal-based sources of food. To serve the residents of Utqiaġvik, my crew of local teenagers and I built a unique botanical garden emphasizing edible plants, of which were collected from the surrounding area. The project was meant to support public health, to serve as an Indigenous teaching instrument, and to act as an inspirational and interactive exhibit. The garden encourages people to reacquaint themselves with tundra plants and provides a means for elders who are no longer physically mobile to share their knowledge across generations without having to travel far. It is a place to learn about the plants, and the garden provides an accessible learning space for both locals and visitors to the community.

 

Speaker bioLorene Lynn is a soil scientist and restoration ecologist who specializes in permafrost characterization, tundra rehabilitation, and boreal forest restoration. She primarily works for oil and gas, government, and community clients in the Arctic and for mining, government, and private clients throughout Alaska. Lorene is a federally appointed member and Chair of the Science Technical Advisory Panel (STAP) for the North Slope Science Initiative (NSSI). Previously, she worked for HDR, the NRCS Soil Survey, and the USFWS. Her graduate studies on coastal erosion along the Beaufort Sea Coast of Alaska sparked a career in which she rarely experiences heat, instead working in a parka in the Arctic in the months most people associate with summer. She lives in Palmer, Alaska with her husband and dog. Her two children have launched lives of their own in Alaska.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Interim Reforestation of Soil Stockpiles

Abstract:

Industrial disturbances, whether in the mining or oil and gas sector, typically result in the clearing of forests and stockpiling of surface soils during the development and operational phases of industrial activity. In Alberta, operators are mandated to ensure stockpiles are stable and non-erosive, constructed in order to maximize soil surface area (shallower slopes being optimal) and that weeds or other invasive species are managed appropriately. Management of these stockpiles will be required until final reclamation activities when the facilities are removed, the site is re-contoured and stockpiled soils are spread. Historical (and present) practices include seeding with grasses and use of chemical herbicides to control establishment of noxious weeds.

Temporary reforestation of soil stockpiles, is an alternative, though not widely utilized practice that may better fit the fundamental long-term final reclamation goals in forested settings (restoring a functional forest). Potential benefits of temporary reforestation of stockpiled soil include: long-term erosion control, reduced invasion of weedy vegetation through increased forest cover and shading and increased habitat availability for wildlife. In addition, temporary reforestation is also likely to enhance the root and seed propagule bank and provide coarse woody material final reclamation.

This webinar will present an alternative approach to conventional soil stockpile management, the interim (or temporary) reforestation of soil stockpiles. In 2015, a case study was initiated on 8 hectares of an in-situ facility soil stockpile. An overview of the operational activities and findings during the first four growing seasons will be presented.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Natural Stable Channel Design

Abstract:

Houston and Harris County, Texas have been at the center of numerous national stories regarding disaster-level flooding in recent years. Since the year 2000, Houston has endured 10 storm events greater than the statistically-predicted 100-year precipitation event. The Harris County Flood Control District (HCFCD) has been responsible for providing flood protection to this vibrant metropolitan area of over 4.6 million people since a special purpose district created by the Texas Legislature in 1937 in response to devastating floods that struck the region in 1929 and 1935. In the 1990’s the HCFCD, in accordance with their statutory mission to “Provide flood damage reduction projects that work, with appropriate regard for community and natural values” began to incorporate the emerging technology of fluvial geomorphology and stream restoration into the development and management of their critical flood control system and infrastructure. Today, the HCFCD applies this naturalistic engineering approach wherever possible in their efforts to meet the ever-increasing flood control needs of this community that is expected to exceed a metropolitan area population of 10 million residents by 2040. This webinar will demonstrate how these efforts have been successful in proving the ability of these methodologies to provide the ultimate solution for meeting flood control, resiliency, and water quality goals for this community. It is hoped that the webinar will inform the participants sufficiently

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Diversity is Magic: Emerging issues in selecting appropriate native plant materials

Abstract:
Selecting species and seed from appropriate sources to maximize project success faces many challenges.  This presentation will review plant selection for ecosystem diversity that supports economically and ecologically practical outcomes. Habitat degradation and loss have accelerated globally, resulting in loss of biological diversity and species endangerment at unprecedented scales. Restoring habitats that provide ecosystem services necessary for all life is crucial. One of the biggest hurdles to habitat restoration is the availability of seeds of native plants to provide a diverse and resilient base of the food chain. Plant diversity is now clearly a fundamental driver of ecosystem services and the diversity of other organisms, and native plant diversity is needed because invasive plants tend to reduce diversity and homogenize vegetation on the landscape. Seeding with native plants is one of the few reliable methods of restoring diversity at all levels, even in the face of climate change and controversial novel ecosystems. Therefore, selecting and sourcing the right plants for restoration sites is vital for the successful establishment of diverse and resilient native ecosystems.  This presentation webinar will describe the results of recent published and unpublished research on local adaptation, successful creation of diverse regional seed admixtures, the importance of landscape context, and innovative species selection strategies and tools.
 
Speaker: Dr. Tom Kaye is founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Applied Ecology (IAE), a nonprofit organization with a mission to conserve native habitats and species through research, restoration, and education. Tom serves on the board of directors of the Society for Ecological Restoration and he is a courtesy Associate Professor in the Department of Botany and Plant Pathology at Oregon State University. Tom conducts research on rare species reintroductions, habitat restoration, plant invasions, and plant population responses to climate change, and engages prison inmates in conservation through the Sagebrush in Prisons Project. Sourcing native plants for restoration is a key area of interest, research and publication for Dr. Kaye. He serves as a Commission Member on the IUCN SSC Seed Conservation Specialist Group.
Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Creating a restoration-based rural economy and reviving traditional ecological knowledge

Abstract:

The webinar will present case study from India of a restoration project that combines the objectives of creating alternate livelihoods for local communities of indigenous peoples based on ecological restoration and at the same time reviving traditional ecological knowledge of indigenous groups whose connect with their natural environment is fast vanishing. The restoration project is being managed by Junglescapes, a non-profit engaged in restoring degraded forests. The project site is in a major tiger reserve in South India which lies in the Western Ghats, a global biodiversity hotspot. Junglescapes received the Full Circle Award in 2017 for its ongoing work with local communities.

Speaker bio: Ramesh Venkataraman is a Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner and has been carrying out restoration of degraded forest areas in India since 2007. He is part of Junglescapes, a non-profit that has successfully pioneered a community-participative restoration model. A major focus of the effort is on managing invasive species, as well as restoring forest patches with high anthropogenic pressures. Ramesh is also actively engaged in restoration education in India. He is an active member of SER.
Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

A Framework for Climate-smart Restoration

Abstract:

Ecological restoration efforts are being implemented in the context of a rapidly changing climate, which poses a new set of challenges and uncertainty. Climate-smart restoration is the process of enhancing the ecological function of degraded, damaged, or destroyed areas in a manner that makes them resilient to the consequences of climate change. The presentation will provide an overview of Point Blue’s climate-smart restoration framework and demonstrate how it can be used to inform planning and design for various restoration projects, drawing on examples from riparian and wetland systems in California.

Speaker bio: Marian Vernon is the Sierra Meadow Adaptation Leader at Point Blue Conservation Science, where she works with partners to catalyze climate-smart meadow restoration and land conservation in the Sierra Nevada. Her background is in the conservation, policy, management, and governance of public and private lands and wildlife in the western U.S. She received her Masters of Environmental Science degree from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in 2015.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Natural Processes for the Restoration of Drastically Disturbed Sites

Abstract:

Join Dave Polster as he discusses the restoration of drastically disturbed sites using natural processes.Learn how we can take advantage of processes that have developed over millions of years to aid in the restoration of difficult-to-restore sites. How can we develop restoration practices that work with the natural world?

Dave Polster has 43 years of experience in vegetation studies, reclamation, and invasive species management. He graduated from the University of Victoria with his BSc. in 1975 and his MSc. in 1977. He has developed a wide variety of reclamation techniques for mines, industrial developments, steep or unstable slopes, and for the re-establishment of riparian and aquatic habitats.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Rebuilding a house of cards: Restoring the equilibrium in Indonesia’s tropical peatlands

Abstract:

Indonesia’s extensive tropical peatland domes contain a globally critical reservoir of carbon. Their forests have become a final refuge to endangered mammals such orangutans, sun bears and clouded leopards, and provide livelihoods, environmental stability and spiritual-identity to indigenous communities.
These tropical peatlands have become severely and extensively degraded through logging and land conversion for agriculture, both requiring peatland drainage. The degraded peatlands now burn with almost annual frequency. When surface fires transition into the peat, they release toxic gases, large volumes of small particulates, and huge volumes of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere – the Asian Haze Crisis.

The Indonesian Government is working to rehabilitate its peatlands, but planted seedlings still die through continued fires and disturbed hydrology. Fire management efforts are often only short-term, and rewetting after drainage is extremely expensive and physically challenging. Local indigenous communities have a deep understanding of the ecology of the system, and want it to see it restored. Poor economic, livelihood, health and education options, and unclear land tenure, however, leave them feeling incapacitated.

Tropical peatlands are an ecosystem dependent on stability and equilibriums. When these are disturbed, the whole system becomes degraded, questionably past its tipping point. Restoring the balance of this equilibrium requires understanding and methods in the biophysical, social, economic and politic environment. In this webinar I will present the balance of these different factors from a case-study perspective of single peat dome: its degradation history, and the restoration efforts of my organisation, The Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation, BOSF-Mawas Program. I propose that implementing truly inter-disciplinary restoration for Indonesia’s peatlands is rather like building a house of cards.

Speaker – Laura Graham, BOSF-Mawas

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Scaling up forest landscape restoration in Canada in an era of cumulative effects and climate change

Abstract:

While the global restoration movement is rapidly gaining momentum, understanding the concept and benefits of forest and landscape restoration (FLR) is paramount to safeguarding the natural capital of Canada’s forests. In the face of increasing cumulative effects, we investigated the opportunities for scaling up FLR efforts in Canadian forests. The pace of industrial natural resource extraction developments (logging, agriculture, mining, and energy sector), and their overlapping in time and space with the impacts of climate change have resulted in ecosystem function and services alteration, as well as changes in natural disturbance regimes (e.g., wildland fire and pests). These dramatic and synergistic changes to environmental, socio-economic and cultural values occurring in the landscape need to be considered in land use planning but are highly variable and uncertain. We suggested that adding FLR to the land …

Resource Type:Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2020

SER Webinar: The ecological restoration of dunes in Puerto Rico to improve climate change resilience

Abstract:

Puerto Rico was severely impacted by hurricanes Irma, María in 2017 and winter storm Riley in 2018. As a result of this most of the coastal dunes on the north coast of the island were destroyed or degraded making coastal communities more vulnerable than ever to the effects of future storms or other effects of climate change. Since 2018 we have been restoring the affected areas are using natural regeneration, assisted regeneration and reconstruction approaches with simple but effective ecological restoration treatment prescriptions. We are using methods such as the installation of wooden boardwalks and a novel biomimicry matrix method that has resulted in significant sand accumulations in the affected areas. This has allowed us to repair breaches or start dunes in areas that were destroyed by the storms with significant success. The accumulated sand is then stabilized with vegetation. We are using unoccupied aerial vehicle technology and biomimicry software to collect baseline data, plan and monitor our restoration work. Our efforts also include an environmental education component that is helping us educate the communities on the importance of ecological restoration of coastal areas. Our project is not only restoring the coast but is restoring our younger generations creating more resilient communities and a new generation of environmental professionals that will probably turn, solutions to environmental problems, into effective public policy. Speaker: Robert J. Mayer Ph.D., CERP, was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico. He has a B.S. in Biology (U. of Puerto Rico Rio), a master’s degree in zoology (U. of Wisconsin-Madison), and a PhD in Environment (Duke University Marine Laboratory). He is a professor of Biology at the University of Puerto Rico at Aguadilla and directs the Center of Conservation and Ecological Restoration also known as “Vida Marina”. his center has been active in finding solutions to the problem of marine debris and the ecological restoration ecological restoration of sand dunes.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER-Europe Webinar: The State of Ecological Restoration in Finland

Abstract:

Join Dr. Anne Tolvanen, of the Natural Resources Institute Finland, to learn about the current state of ecological restoration in Finland.

This is the first of a 2021 webinar series by SER Europe – every 2nd Wednesday of the month at 18hr CET a member of SER-E will lecture us on the State of Ecological Restoration on her/his Country, followed by a Q&A and a conclusion on best practices and further research + innovation networking.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Selecting native plant material for restoration projects in different ecosystems

Abstract:

Due to loss of natural ecosystems and biodiversity around the world along the past decades, international initiatives are being developed to establish a foundation for the restoration of diverse ecosystems, prioritizing ecosystem biodiversity and resilience while also recognizing impacts on rural livelihoods and carbon storage. As programs have become more refined, a shift from revegetation with available material to using native plant materials of known genetic origin has been underway, and achieving increasing priority at an international level. Through research and collaborative partnerships, on local, regional and international levels, and between public and private sectors, approaches are being developed that addresses the challenges in using native genetic plant material in ecological restoration. Four study cases from different geographic locations and climatic conditions were selected to demonstrate the successes in using native genetic plant material, developing a baseline for native genetic resource management, and meeting challenges according to every ecosystem’s limiting factors. In Jordan’s desert ecosystem a developed native seed strategy has majorly improved seedling quality and post-planting survival rate. In the tropical ecosystem of Guinea Conakry, the major challenge is to identify best seed collection times and seed handling techniques to improve seed germination and propagation of native seedlings through seeds for the restoration of the Bossou corridor. Within Morocco’s Atlas Mountains, an emphasis is being made on the development of a traceability system for native genetic plant material used in restoration projects, considering the genetic variability within native species, starting with Cedrus atlantica. In Lebanon, considering the diverse ecosystems, a scheme for the selection of native plant material is developed within every restoration project, for dryland, riparian or forest ecosystems.

Speaker:

Karma Bouazza received her Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Engineering and her Master of Science in Plant Protection from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon. She has worked since 2011 with the U.S. Forest Service International Programs in Lebanon, Jordan, Guinea, Zimbabwe, Morocco and Rwanda. Through research and collaborative partnerships, she has worked on developing approaches that addresses the challenges in using native genetic plant material in ecological restoration in diverse geographic locations and climatic conditions. Currently, she is also leading the Research and Development Component at the Lebanon Reforestation Initiative NGO, aiming at first identifying research gaps throughout the different fields of ecological restoration and wildlife conservation that hinder the sustainability of landscape management.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Moving to Industrial-Scale Coral Habitat Restoration

Abstract:

Jesper Elzinga, Van Oord Dredging and Marine Contractors, talks on ‘The Recovery of Reefs Using Industrial Techniques for Slick Harvesting and Release (RECRUIT)’ followed by Joaquim Garrabou, Spanish Research Council (CSIC), Barcelona on ‘Lessons Learned from Coral Restoration in Shallow and Deep Environments’. There is potential to assist the recovery of impacted coral habitats through marine ecosystem restoration, but can it be achieved at a meaningful scale? This webinar addressed some of the methods that might be used in restoration of coral habitats and their applicability at larger scales.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020

Fieldwork in the time of COVID-19

Abstract:

Join a panel of practitioners from several realms (governmental, contracting, and non-profit) to learn how they are adapting field work plans to reduce risks to practitioners and community members in the time of COVID 19. As we are all learning and adapting to this strange new world together, we’ll wrap up with time for participants to share their own ideas and ask questions of panelists and each other.

Speakers include the following SER-NW chapter board members: Jeff Barna, Ben Peterson, and Regina Wandler.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2020
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

University of Montana COVID-19 Guidelines for Off-campus Field Research

Abstract:

Guidelines for off-campus field research developed by the University of Montana (as of May 4, 2020).

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2020

Guidelines for volunteers and volunteer organizations during COVID-19 outbreak in Washington

Abstract:

During this national emergency, we understand individuals who are not suffering from the coronavirus may want to help. However, all volunteer activities must follow critical health and safety protocols so we can protect volunteers, residents, clients, and agencies. This document provides general guidelines for volunteers and volunteer organizations and may be useful is developing organization-specific best practices.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2020