Resource Database

©Danilo Lima, Agripalm Ambiental

The RRC database contains a wide variety of resources and publications related to ecological restoration, and we are actively working to expand this collection. It is our aim to serve as the principal clearinghouse for information and tools to support the work of researchers, practitioners, land managers, educators, students, and anyone else interested in restoration. Use the filter tool below to search the database by title, author, resource type, keyword, or any combination of these factors.

Although SER does review all entries in the database for relevance and quality, these resources have not been rigorously reviewed or extensively vetted in every case, and SER therefore makes no claim as to their accuracy or accordance with generally accepted principles in the field. The database is provided as a resource for visitors to the SER website, and it is ultimately left to the individual user to make their own determinations about the quality and veracity of a given publication or resource.

If there is a resource we missed, please let us know! We are interested in current books, articles, technical documents, videos, and other resources that are directly relevant to ecological restoration science, practice or policy, as well as resources treating the social, cultural and economic dimensions of restoration.

Publication Year:
Resource Type
Keyword
Title
Author

 

INSR Native Seed Workshop: International Network for Seed-Based Restoration

Abstract: Resource Type:Conference Presentation
Publication Date: 2022
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

INSR Native Seed Workshop: Innovative Restoration Efforts in the Sagebrush Sea

Abstract: Resource Type:Conference Presentation
Publication Date: 2022
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

INSR Native Seed Workshop: Native Seed Planning, Sourcing, and Procurement for Restoration

Abstract: Resource Type:Conference Presentation
Publication Date: 2022

INSR Native Seed Workshop: Improving Forb Availability in Wyoming: Beginning with Forb Dormancy Break

Abstract: Resource Type:Conference Presentation
Publication Date: 2022

INSR Native Seed Workshop: IDIQ Procurement System and Forward Contracting for Native Seed Production

Abstract: Resource Type:Conference Presentation
Publication Date: 2022
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

INSR Native Seed Workshop: Forecasting Seed Needs in Western Nevada

Abstract: Resource Type:Conference Presentation
Publication Date: 2022

INSR Native Seed Workshop: National Seed Strategy Update

Abstract: Resource Type:Conference Presentation
Publication Date: 2022

INSR Native Seed Workshop: The Brazilian Native Seed Network

Abstract: Resource Type:Conference Presentation
Publication Date: 2022

SER Webinar: Introducing a New Restoration Project Information Sharing Framework

Abstract:

In 2021, the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) and Climate Focus, on behalf of the Global Restoration Observatory (GRO) network, co-led a collaborative effort to formalize a sector-wide Restoration Project Information Sharing Framework. The Framework represents the collective thinking of more than 80 individuals from 55 organizations representing 27 countries, including many SER members. It is designed to support more coordinated global tracking of progress and trends in ecosystem restoration and to create the potential for interoperability among the many platforms and databases that collect, aggregate, evaluate, and provide access to data on ecosystem restoration. This webinar will introduce the indicators, how they were developed, and encourage organizations and project managers to adopt relevant and appropriate content from the Framework for their individual monitoring protocols, reporting systems, databases, and platforms.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2022
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Farming Native Seed for the Future: Considering Evolutionary Potential and Ecological Function

Abstract:

Agricultural seed production is needed to meet ambitious restoration goals, which will require more seeds than can be harvested from wild populations. However, there may be direct conflicts between traits that are favorable in conventional agriculture and those that are adaptive in restoration settings, which could have long-lasting impacts on restored communities. Here, we review some of these evolutionary and ecological conflicts and suggest research directions needed to meld the needs of agriculturalists and restoration practitioners. Partnerships between ecologists, engineers, breeders, and growers are essential to develop best practices for providing seeds for successful native species restoration.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2022
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Abstract:

In the midst of increased ecosystem degradation and the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, it is important that we continually evaluate our restoration practices. Restoration practices generally have a taxonomic bias towards plant species and communities. However, by focusing on a single organismal group, restoration outcomes are often inconsistent and rarely leads to the reestablishment of target ecosystems or their services. One important factor that is often overlooked are plant interactions with fungal symbionts. This is a considerable oversight, as a multitude of studies have documented the important role symbiotic fungi have on plant functioning and plant community assembly. This talk will examine two potential roles that plant-fungal symbionts can serve in ecological restoration: as indicators of the state of recovery and an ecosystem component that can be manipulated to improve restoration outcomes.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2022
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Coastal Resilience Success Stories (NFWF Case Studies)

Abstract:

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) commissioned ERG to conduct a yearlong project in 2021 to gather and share best practices from coastal resilience practitioners to enhance implementation of coastal resilience efforts across the United States. The project encompassed a review of more than 100 source documents, as well as interviews with resilience practitioners. NFWF and ERG used the findings from this research to develop eight case studies documenting successful projects throughout the country.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2022

Predicting Restoration Outcomes: From Concept to Practice

Abstract:

Restoration outcomes are notorious for being unpredictable. Similar restoration actions, carried out on seemingly similar sites, can result in variable outcomes and this unpredictability challenges our capacity to meet specific goals. In turn, this points to the need to develop predictive capacities in restoration. But what will this look like and what challenges must be overcome to develop restoration into a predictive science? We outline an approach for predicting restoration outcomes and describe key challenges that must be overcome, to put this vision into practice. We then describe a research project, where we are putting these ideas into practice, to predict the outcomes of longleaf pine woodlands restoration.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2022

SER-E Webinar: State of Ecological Restoration in Norway

Abstract:

Join SER-Europe, Berit Köhler, Dagmar Hagen, and Astrid Brekke Skrindo for a discussion of the state of ecological restoration in Norway.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2022
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

A Green-Gray Path to Global Water Security and Sustainable Infrastructure

Abstract:

Sustainable development demands reliable water resources, yet traditional water management has broadly failed to avoid environmental degradation and contain infrastructure costs. We explore the global-scale feasibility of combining natural capital with engineering-based (green-gray) approaches to meet water security threats over the 21st century. Threats to water resource systems are projected to rise throughout this period, together with a significant expansion in engineering deployments and progressive loss of natural capital. In many parts of the world, strong path dependencies are projected to arise from the legacy of prior environmental degradation that constrains future water management to a heavy reliance on engineering-based approaches. Elsewhere, retaining existing stocks of natural capital creates opportunities to employ blended green-gray water infrastructure.

By 2050, annual engineering expenditures are projected to triple to $2.3 trillion, invested mainly in developing economies. In contrast, preserving natural capital for threat suppression represents a potential $3.0 trillion in avoided replacement costs by mid-century. Society pays a premium whenever these nature-based assets are lost, as the engineering costs necessary to achieve an equivalent level of threat management are, on average, twice as expensive. Countries projected to rapidly expand their engineering investments while losing natural capital will be most constrained in realizing green-gray water management. The situation is expected to be most restrictive across the developing world, where the economic, technical, and governance capacities to overcome such challenges remain limited. Our results demonstrate that policies that support blended green-gray approaches offer a pathway to future global water security but will require a strategic commitment to preserving natural capital. Absent such stewardship, the costs of water resource infrastructure and services will likely rise substantially and frustrate efforts to attain universal and sustainable water security.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2022

A New Legal Principle on Ecological Restoration: A New Way to Scale Up Restoration?

Abstract:

The United Nations Decade of Ecosystem Restoration is an opportunity for States to advance the development of substantive and qualitative international law obligations for conducting restoration activities. This will help countries move beyond the more quantitative target-driven approach that currently focuses international commitments on the percentage of degraded areas that have to be restored. In this webinar we argue for a possible new pathway for States to accelerate and pursue international obligations to undertake ecological restoration by advocating for the development of a new international legal principle on ecological restoration. This principle would add to existing principles such as the prevention principle, and aims at achieving the highest level of recovery possible. The webinar will explain what legal principles are and what their value is. The webinar will look into the new principle on ecological restoration, its meaning and core elements underpinning this principle, and give examples how this could be used in practice.

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2022
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

SER-E Webinar: OBN, 30 years of science-practice collaboration in the Netherlands

Abstract:

Join W.A. (Wim) Wiersinga to learn more about his work as Program Leader of the Dutch Knowledge Network for Restoration and Management of Nature (OBN).

Resource Type:Webinar
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Scaling Up Ecologically Appropriate Seed Supply in Canada: How the National Tree Seed Centre Can Help

Abstract:

The National Tree Seed Centre (NTSC) is Canada’s only national seed bank conserving the genetic diversity of temperate and boreal forest species. Since 1967, the NTSC has curated a living library for the global research community, with over 18,000 unique collections of 120 native woody species, detailed by collection coordinates. This diverse collection is available to anyone researching any aspect of ecology, biochemistry, breeding, genomics, restoration, reclamation, climate change or for educational purposes. Seed collections to protect and study herbaceous plant species at risk are also underway with First Nations, Parks Canada, NGOs and jurisdictional governments.

In this virtual workshop, NTSC staff will lead a tour of the seed bank, tissue culture and cryogenic facilities in Fredericton, New Brunswick. We will demonstrate the core collection activities, seed quality control, standard and exploratory testing, and 50 years of seed trait data available for restoration planning. Federal collaborators will present related research from the fields of genomics, Species at Risk recovery, and climate-based seed transfer.

The NTSC will engage SER2021 participants to help overcome challenges related to seed supply and conservation in Canada, before cumulative stressors accelerate. Key questions include “How can NTSC support your projects and supply chain of native plant materials?”, “How do we encourage policies requiring appropriate seed outside of industrial forestry?”, and “What Canadian species need a seed based action plan now?”. Workshop polling and post-conference surveys will harness the power of this conference to improve seed-based restoration outcomes in all temperate forest biomes.

Resource Type:Conference Presentation, SER2021
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Drawing restoration goals from the bottom-up: Assessing local interest in ecosystem services

Abstract:

Successfully achieving our urgent and ambitious global restoration goals will depend on how well communities embrace restoration programs at a local scale. Restoration initiatives are frequently implemented using top-down decision-making strategies where non-local organizations determine the goals and expected restoration outcomes on the ground, which can result in conflicting expectations among stakeholders. But empowering local communities in restoration planning can enhance the success of restoration initiatives over the long-term. This study aimed to assess local interest in enhancing ecosystem services associated with forest restoration in landscapes of varying degrees of degradation, as a means to promote inclusive, diverse and ethical restoration planning. We used an interdisciplinary mixed-methods approach to collect and assess both quantitative and qualitative data. We facilitated focus group interviews and community mapping activities using satellite imagery for 26groups of local community members in 14 rural districts in the Ecuadorian Andes and Amazon in 2019. Our results show that community members are more interested in enhancing regulating ecosystem services (45%) than cultural (30%) or provisioning (25%) services. Interest in ecosystem services depended on local need (e.g., landslide mitigation, water supply) and the degree of landscape degradation. Locals living in landscapes with higher degradation preferred a higher number and diversity of ecosystem services compared to locals in less degraded landscapes. Learning about the local needs, interests, and landscape conditions can help restoration practitioners to support the design of restoration initiatives that empower locals to guarantee the persistence of restored areas for the achievement of the restoration goals.

Resource Type:Conference Presentation, SER2021
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

S6.2 IX International Meeting FuegoRED2020: Post-fire restoration in a changing world: vulnerability and resilience of forest ecosystems to fire

Abstract: Resource Type:Conference Presentation
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Seed morphometrics as a tool to site-specific seed sourcing for population reinforcement

Abstract:

Seed-based ecological restoration requires a careful selection of the source genetic material when aiming at the conservation of an evolutionarily significant unit or a strict endemic species. The Mediterranean basin is a biodiversity hotspot, characterised by high endemism shaped by the history of the climatic events. Plant population restoration requires specific considerations when it comes to seed sourcing. Morphological description of a discriminant feature is the most commonly used taxonomic criteria, however, multivariate morphometrics detect intraspecific morphological variations. Phenotype characterisation provides an accessible argument in seed sourcing prior to site restoration.

Mericarps of the strict endemic Ferula melitensis (Brullo et al., 2018) were collected from three different sites in the Maltese Islands and subjected to multivariate morphometrics based on ImageJ analysis. The shape of the mericarps has an important taxonomic role for this genus, and elongation variability in the characteristic oblong shape of the mericarp is found to be the main discriminant feature between populations (Figure 1), highlighting the morphological variability of this species at small geographical scale.

These results complete the recent morphological and genetic analysis of Ferula melitensis, which have established it as a distinct species from the more widespread Ferula communis. Consideration of the phenotype of the target species is crucial for population reinforcement, and the implementation of this standardised methodology using open-access software (ImageJ, Particles8) ensures both replicability and application to a wide range of species. The results provide a crucial tool for the improvement of sourcing site-specific seed material for native population reinforcement.

Resource Type:Conference Presentation, SER2021
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

In search of disturbed lands: a community science approach for landscape level restoration priority setting and planning

Abstract:

Amid a crisis of biodiversity loss and estimates of degraded lands between 1–7B ha, ecological restoration is seen as an important pathway to restore and sustain biodiversity, ecosystem services, and related benefits. However, many managers lack the tools they need to systematically and comprehensively identify disturbed sites to prioritize restoration efforts given limited resources. We developed a novel, inexpensive, low-tech approach for training and engaging citizen scientists to identify areas in need of restoration within a defined area. The mapping process follows four phases: 1) Landscape scans by volunteers using Google Earth Pro (GE) imagery; 2) A second scan of all detected disturbances based on high resolution aerial photography; 3) Compilation of basic information about the degraded sites; 4) Addition of associated plant communities. We detected 67 new sites not previously identified by managers using an estimated 220 volunteer hours and only 20 staff hours. Each site has accompanying information including distance from nearest access point, cause of disturbance, and plant and soils detail. After completion, we conducted independent field visits of 33% of the detected sites and verified disturbance in all cases. We found that the remotely sensed approach provided better perspective to accurately measure the scale and original source of disturbance compared with field visits. The approach can be conducted over a relatively short period of time, using multiple volunteers, and allows managers to undertake landscape level restoration prioritization and planning and, if repeated, it can be used to monitor changes in degradation over time.

Resource Type:Conference Presentation, SER2021
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

S7.1 Marine Ecosystem Restoration in changing oceans

Abstract: Resource Type:Conference Presentation
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Seed viability, germination, and early survival of Spartina alterniflora from the Bay of Fundy and Northumberland Strait for salt marsh restoration

Abstract:

Along the east coasts of North America, the saltwater cordgrass Spartina alterniflora is the bioengineer species of salt marshes, and essential for salt marsh restoration. However, at north temperate latitudes, little is known about its reproductive biology. Our research objective is to determine and compare seed viability, germination success and early seedling survival for different populations of S. alterniflora (both phenotypes: short and tall forms) in Maritime Canada. Specifically, we had short-form and tall-form S. alterniflora locations for each of 4 replicate salt marshes in each of the Bay of Fundy (macrotidal environment) and Northumberland Strait (microtidal environment). In September-October 2020, we collected ripe seeds (i.e., caryopsis) from each location once our shake test showed ~10 felled seeds. Seeds were stored for cold stratification, submerged in freshwater and 40 ppt saltwater at 4o C for ~12 wk. Following this, seed viability tested using tetrazolium chloride (TTC) was ~35–55%. Germination, under recommended diurnal thermoperiod conditions and scored using appearance of embryonic shoot (epicotyl) and root, was on average 35±1% after 2 wks and 45±2% after 1 mo (±SE, n=252 batches), with higher germination following freshwater (41–50% after 2 wks) than saltwater (22–26%) storage. Further, germination patterns were similar for short-form and tall-form phenotypes, but more variable and somewhat lower in the Northumberland Strait than in Bay of Fundy. Growth and survival of seedlings are being quantified in the greenhouse under three watering treatments: 0 ppt, 10 ppt, and incremental increases of 5 ppt/wk starting at 10 ppt, until full strength seawater is reached. Current average seedling survival after 8 wks in the greenhouse is 50.1%. Future plans include evaluating performance of seedling during outplanting in summer 2021. This research will contribute to creating a guide for salt marsh restoration and creation for Maritime Canada, by evaluating the strategy of using S. alterniflora seedlings.

Resource Type:Conference Presentation, SER2021
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Science Based? Yes, but Ecological Restoration is also all about Compromise

Abstract:

When planning projects, ecological restoration practitioners aim for the gold standard based on the best available science. In many instances, however, we are confronted with a barrage of challenges including, but not limited to, conflicting interest groups, competing habitat interests, scope/budget challenges, regulatory barriers, funder priorities, historical relationships and public distrust. These challenges often require adjustment to the scientific method and ultimately alter the end project – it
all boils down to compromise. In academia, as in our careers, we are trained to focus on science-based procedures that lead to predictable outcomes. As a practitioner with over 10 years of experience I have learned that ecological restoration, while science-based, is much more complex when put into practice. The soft skills required to manage these projects are just as valuable as the science itself. This presentation will explore the complexities of restoration projects, with an emphasis on stream restoration in highly altered, heavily used locations with sensitive habitats in regulated environments. I will reference Southern Ontario case studies, emphasizing the importance of honest communication, ongoing engagement and tactful negotiation to fulfill project goals and satisfy the needs of diverse parties. Establishing a culture where compromise is accepted, and even encouraged, is crucial for creating successful, resilient projects that have long lasting benefits within an entire community.

Resource Type:Conference Presentation, SER2021
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

S7.2 Marine Ecosystem Restoration in changing oceans

Abstract: Resource Type:Conference Presentation
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Seeds of Success: Cultivating 20 Years of Plant Conservation

Abstract:

Seeds of Success (SOS) is a national native seed collection program in the US, led by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in partnership with the USDA Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, USDA Agricultural Research Service and many non-federal partners. SOS is the first step in the native plant materials development process to increase the quality and quantity of native seed available for restoring and supporting resilient ecosystems. SOS collections of wildland native seed are used for seed research and development such as germination trials, common garden studies, and protocol establishment. Additional uses include germplasm conservation, seed production, and ecosystem restoration. Portions of each collection are also held in long-term storage facilities for conservation.

SOS was established in 2001 by the BLM and includes many partners, such as botanic gardens, arboreta, zoos, and municipalities. All SOS teams share a common protocol to coordinate seed collecting and species targeting efforts.

To date, SOS has made more than 26,000 native seed collections comprising 5,800 unique taxa from 43 states across the US. In 2015, BLM received a $3.5 million mitigation award because of Hurricane Sandy to collect seed in coastal habitats from Virginia to Maine. Current SOS priorities include ecoregional programs in the Great Basin, Colorado Plateau, and Mojave Desert. Efforts are also underway to expand partnerships in the Southeastern U.S. to preserve the incredible plant biodiversity of the region.

Resource Type:Conference Presentation, SER2021
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program

Structured decision-making for Maritime Live Oak forest restoration

Abstract:

Maritime Live Oak (Quercus virginiana; MLO) forests along the Georgia (U.S.A.) coast are highly regarded for their multiple natural and cultural heritage values. In recent decades, MLO forests have shown evidence of limited live oak recruitment, which may result in undesired long-term effects on tree community structure, function, and resilience. Many MLO forest stewards and scientists share a common interest in conserving forests by planting live oaks to augment existing populations. But there is uncertainty regarding potential restoration strategies because knowledge about MLO ecosystem dynamics is limited and fragmented among stakeholders. We used structured decision-making to collaboratively develop a decision-support tool for live oak tree-planting strategies. First, we held workshops with MLO forest stewards to identify: the managers’ long-term objectives and shorter-term success indicators; spatial and temporal scales of likely management actions; a set of potential management options; and data, legal, and resource constraints. Then we constructed a transition matrix model using empirical data and expert knowledge to estimate parameters for juvenile tree growth and survival rates associated with alternative treeplanting strategies. The decision support tool incorporated the transition model and associated cost estimates of management alternatives in order to project likely outcomes, costs, associated uncertainties, and the degree to which alternatives would meet different management objectives. This process ensured that we capitalized on diverse understandings and perspectives and that the decision support tool would be directly relevant to stewards’ values, objectives, and information needs.

Resource Type:Conference Presentation, SER2021
Publication Date: 2021
Pre-approved for CECs under SER's CERP program