Resource Database

©Danilo Lima, Agripalm Ambiental

The RRC database contains a wide variety of resources and publications related to ecological restoration, and we are actively working to expand this collection. It is our aim to serve as the principal clearinghouse for information and tools to support the work of researchers, practitioners, land managers, educators, students, and anyone else interested in restoration. Use the filter tool below to search the database by title, author, resource type, keyword, or any combination of these factors.

Although SER does review all entries in the database for relevance and quality, these resources have not been rigorously reviewed or extensively vetted in every case, and SER therefore makes no claim as to their accuracy or accordance with generally accepted principles in the field. The database is provided as a resource for visitors to the SER website, and it is ultimately left to the individual user to make their own determinations about the quality and veracity of a given publication or resource.

If there is a resource we missed, please let us know! We are interested in current books, articles, technical documents, videos, and other resources that are directly relevant to ecological restoration science, practice or policy, as well as resources treating the social, cultural and economic dimensions of restoration.

Publication Year:
Resource Type
Keyword
Title
Author
 

The Role of Networks Connecting Native Seed Stakeholders

Connecting stakeholders and facilitating the transfer of knowledge is crucial to improve success in ecological restoration. Like the nodes of the ecological networks we aim to restore, those who work with native seeds are connected and dependent on each other for information and resources to address the challenges of seed conservation, research, production and use. Presented by INSR’s Marcello de Vitis.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Peatland Restoration

50 % of the original peatland area of Finland has been drained for forestry. This had an immense degrading impact on the natural values of mires. Peatland restoration has been found as an effective way to regain these values. More than 25 000 hectares of different types of peatlands has been restored since the beginning of the 1990´s. In restoration the mire must become more permanently waterlogged again. This is best achieved by completely filling in ditches and by removing trees. The results of restoration are evaluated by different monitoring methods.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

ROOT – A decision-support tool

Presented by Craig Beatty of LERS and IUCN. Following over three years of development through a partnership between International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and The Natural Capital Project, ROOT (Restoration Opportunities Optimization Tool) is a software tool that optimises trade-offs among different ecosystem services to help decision-makers visualise where investments in restoration could be made that would optimise benefits for multiple landscape goals.

Technically, ROOT applies an integrated linear programming algorithm which optimises and displays the location of the expected ecosystem services generated through restoration. Most notably, it does so for multiple ecosystem services at the same time and can weigh these optimisations based on the location of people who rely on such services. This includes optimising landscape restoration interventions in areas that would generate clean water, or avoiding areas where disadvantaged people might be negatively affected by changes or modifications in land use. The result is knowledge that is not purely biophysical, but instead blends the social priorities of those with the rights to manage land with the ecosystem service benefits that are expected from restoration.

This webinar will explore why ROOT was designed, how it works, and a few case studies showing the different results that it can generate and the implication of those results in national and international large-scale restoration programmes and policies.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Natural Processes for the Restoration of Drastically Disturbed Sites

Presented by SERNW. Dave Polster, Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner (CERP) presents on effective strategies to understand and utilize natural processes in restoration.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Restoration, Wildfire, Recovery

Presented by SERNW. Vicky Erickson, Lenya Quinn-Davidson, and Karin Riley discuss the role of wildfire and post-wildfire restoration in the Pacific Northwest.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Raising the standard in restoration after mining

Presented by Kingsley Dixon, chair of SER Australasia and Director of the Australian Research Council’s Centre for Mine Site Restoration.

Mining is a global enterprise and combined with oil and gas, occur from the Arctic to Australia and beyond. Since the earliest mining from before the Romans, mining has impacted landscapes, affected livelihoods and is often at odds with traditional land utilisation. Though much of the mining industry globally aspires to high standards of environmental care, few are actively engaged in the process of restoration of sites to a standard that reflect the need to repatriate landscapes and ecosystems that reflect the local environment. In this webinar I will present a snap shot of global impacts, global success stories, emerging technologies for the industry and the role of the International Standards for the Practice of Ecological Restoration in driving higher and better outcomes in the global resources sector.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

SER Certification Program Overview

Join SER’s Certification Program Coordinator Jen Lyndall to learn about the program and hear from Mel Asher, CERP, about a practitioner’s perspective.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Practical Restoration Design, Implementation, and Management for Coastal and Inland Wetlands – Three Case Studies

Co-hosted by SER and Society of Wetland Scientists.

Use of Living Shorelines for Nature-Based Shoreline Protection – Kevin Du Bois

The use of traditional bulkheads, seawalls, and rip rap revetments along low to moderate wave energy shorelines has led to the loss of valuable marine resources and the ecosystem services they provide. “Living Shorelines” are nature-based approaches for shoreline protection that conserve, create, or restore natural shoreline habitats. This presentation will provide an overview of Living Shoreline design and benefits and provide before-and-after photographs to illustrate project successes.

Kevin R. Du Bois is a certified Professional Wetland Scientist, Professional Wetland Delineator, and Certified Floodplain Manager. Over his career, Mr. Du Bois has worked as a state Fisheries Biologist, Sensitive Land Acquisition Specialist, USFWS Endangered Species Biologist, wetland regulator, and environmental educator. Mr. Du Bois has worked for the Navy for 2+ years providing Installation and Regional level services as a NEPA, Natural Resources, and Cultural Resources Project Manager. Mr. Du Bois currently serves as the DoD Chesapeake Bay Program Coordinator.

Little Pine Island Mitigation Bank, Lee County, Florida and Lake Wales Forest Mitigation and Net Ecosystem Benefit Site, Polk County, Florida – Kevin Erwin

The Little Pine Island Mitigation Bank in Lee County, Florida entailed restoration of 4,670± acres of coastal fringe wetlands and uplands that were drained by canals and infested with exotic trees, primarily Melaleuca and Brazilian pepper. This project included the restoration of 48.3± acres of mosquito ditches back to native habitat. The Lake Wales Forest Mitigation and Net Ecosystem Benefit Site in Polk County, Florida is a successful restoration project that encompasses a complex mosaic of hardwood swamp forests, freshwater marshes, and xeric scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge. Both of these world-class restoration projects werefeatured as case studies in the United Nations Environment Program report entitled “Dead Planet, Living Planet – Biodiversity and Ecosystem Restoration for Sustainable Development” (Nellemann, C. and E. Corcoran, eds. 2010).

Kevin Erwin is an internationally recognized, Ecological Society of America certified senior ecologist (1985), specializing in large-scale wetland restoration, biodiversity conservation, and watershed evaluation. Since 1980 he has served as the President and Principal Ecologist of Kevin L. Erwin Consulting Ecologist, Inc. and is also a Courtesy Faculty Member of Florida Gulf Coast University in the Department of Marine & Ecological Sciences.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Restoration Ecology’s 25th Anniversary – Our Top 25 Publications

A collection of Restoration Ecology’s 25 most-cited articles to mark the 25th Anniversary of the journal.

Resource Type: Journal Special Issue
Publication Date: 2018

Seed Dispersal and Soil Seed Banks – Promising Sources for Ecological Restoration

A collection of 15 papers from 10 countries discussing techniques, lessons learned, and knowledge gaps as it relates to seed-based restoration projects. Published with guest editors Péter Török, Aveliina Helm, Kathryn Kiehl, Elise Buisson, and Orsolya Valkó.

Resource Type: Journal Special Issue
Publication Date: 2018

Coastal Zone Management Trust, Quintana Roo, Mexico

This green infrastructure finance mechanism is an innovative financial framework that provides a tool for mobilizing resources to implement restoration. The Nature Conservancy (TNC) designed and will test this first-ever mechanism that leverages the protective service of reefs and secures that ecosystem service with an insurance policy and funding structure. In partnership with the State Government of Quintana Roo, academic institutions, and the tourism and insurance industries, the project lays the groundwork for vulnerable coastal communities to strengthen both physical and financial resilience against climate change. This pilot project will support tourism and local communities by funding reef and beach protection and restoration after severe storms.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2018

Species Recovery Manual

Species recovery involves many different disciplines and actors, and responsibility for it at a national level is often unclear, given that it cuts across different ministries and agencies. After various consultations, it was felt by BGCI and IABG that it would be valuable to produce a manual that would clarify the aims and purpose of species recovery, set out the various steps involved, and indicate good practice. This manual is aimed specifically at conservation practitioners but also includes comprehensive bibliographic references, which enable more in depth reading on the topics covered in this publication. The manual includes chapters and case studies from members of the Ecological Restoration Alliance of Botanic Gardens.

Resource Type: Technical Document
Publication Date: 2018

Ecological Restoration in the Midwest: Past, Present, and Future

This study brings together a group of scholars and practitioners to show how midwestern restoration efforts have developed, and where they are headed, through an analysis of six cutting-edge case studies that highlight thirty restoration efforts and research sites from across the region. The contributing authors uncover a vast network of interested citizens and volunteer groups committed to preserving the region’s environment. The book also pinpoints emerging issues of importance in the Midwest, such as climate change and the increase in invasive species it is expected to bring to the region.

Resource Type: Book
Publication Date: 2018

Oregon Invasive Species Council – A Comprehensive Review of the State Strategy

Invasive species are nonnative organisms that can cause devastating economic and environmental harm. In Oregon, a diversity of organizations across the state are focusing efforts on preventing the establishment of new invasive species and taking actions to eradicate, control, and/or manage the invasive species that have already arrived. In order to conduct a comprehensive and coordinated effort to prevent, detect, control, and eliminate invasive species, the Oregon Legislature established the Oregon Invasive Species Council (OISC) in 2001.

The OISC is comprised of members from state and public agencies, tribes, scientists, educators, and members of the public who lead Oregon’s fight against invasive species and protect Oregon’s natural resources and economy from the harm that invasive species cause. After a collaborative process of input and engagement of many colleagues across the state working to protect Oregon from invasive species, the Council adopted the Statewide Strategic Plan and Action Plan for Invasive Species in 2016, which lays out the long-term and short-term strategies for invasive species control in Oregon. Among the strategies, ecosystem recovery and resilience are prioritized as essential to long-term protection of Oregon’s resources and environments. This holistic approach is necessary for our state to be successful in its battle against invasive species.

 

Jalene Littlejohn is co-founder and director of Samara Group, an Oregon-based consulting firm that was created to enhance environmental projects. Jalene is the Lead Coordinator for the Oregon Invasive Species Council (OISC) and supports a number of other invasive species and conservation initiatives in the region. She has been involved with the SERNW Chapter since 2015 and continues to support the upcoming SER-SWS Joint Regional Conference.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Summary for policymakers of the IPBES thematic assessment report on land degradation and restoration

This is a summary for policymakers of the IPBES thematic assessment of land degradation and restoration. The assessment covers the global status of and trends in land degradation, by region and land cover type; the effect of degradation on biodiversity values, ecosystem services and human well-being; and the state of knowledge, by region and land cover type, of ecosystem restoration extent and options. The assessment was undertaken to enhance the knowledge base for policies for addressing land degradation, desertification and the restoration of degraded land.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2018

Restoration Resource Center: A New Tool for Restorationists

In development for more than a year, the Restoration Resource Center (RRC) is an online platform for exchanging knowledge and experience through ecological restoration projects, publications, and other resources from around the world. Levi Wickwire presents the RRC, including an overview of its history as well as a tutorial of how to search and submit resources to the database. A searchable, crowd-sourced database, it already includes over 215 projects and 2,000 resources ranging from peer-reviewed articles to technical manuals and webinars.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Restoration Strategies for Pollinator Habitats in Urban Landscapes

Presented by Rory Denovan, Restoration Ecologist & Strategic Advisor for city of Seattle; Executive Board Member for Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Chapter; Board Member for Washington Native Plant Society. Rory presents his extensive works involving the restoration of urban landscapes for the purpose of establishing pollinator habitats.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Biodiversity guidelines for forest landscape restoration opportunities assessments

These guidelines are intended to provide more context, more resources and fresh perspectives to the ongoing global interaction between biodiversity conservation and forest landscape restoration. They do so in the context of the Restoration Opportunities Assessment Methodology (ROAM), which is being used by dozens of countries and jurisdictions to help practitioners working on identifying and realizing their landscape restoration goals — and they should be interpreted as a companion to ROAM.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2018

Landscapes, at your service

The Restoration Opportunities Optimization Tool (ROOT) was developed out of a need to more efficiently and effectively communicate the importance of ecosystem services to decision makers. IUCN’s collective experience working to increase ecological productivity and improve human well-being through forest landscape restoration (FLR) demonstrated that although stakeholders were interested in generating ecosystem services from proposed restoration activities, the many services and their interactions with each other were often too complicated to communicate clearly. Furthermore, as a social process, decision makers working towards restoration were interested in more than just the biophysical gains from restoration for different services; they wanted evidence for how restoration might benefit agricultural production, access to jobs or different sources of income, and how investments in restoration might help underserved or marginalized groups. The case studies in this report were chosen based on ongoing FLR assessments as well as the existence of ecosystem services data, and are intended to demonstrate the applicability of ROOT to both technical and non-technical audiences.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2018

Spatially designed revegetation—why the spatial arrangement of plants should be as important to revegetation as they are to natural systems

The spatial arrangements of plants, both within and between species, play a key role in natural systems and influence many fundamental ecological processes (e.g. survival, competition, facilitation, pollination, and seed dispersal) and ecosystem functions (e.g. habitat value, erosion, water, and nutrient capture). Despite this knowledge, fine‐scale planting arrangements are rarely considered during restoration plantings, yet manipulation of planting designs has the potential to aid the development of resilient and self‐sustaining ecosystems. Here, the authors outline how the spatial arrangement of plants can influence processes both at the vegetation level and more broadly at the ecosystem level. The review is focused on woodland systems, but also draws on key examples from grassland ecosystems. Finally, they outline components of population and community level arrangements (e.g. spacing, aggregation, community composition) that can be considered during restoration plantings—spatially designed revegetation—which are likely to lead to improved ecological outcomes of woodland and grassy woodland revegetation.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2018

Post-fire Restoration in the Great Basin – Challenges, Opportunities, and a Call to Make Adaptive Management Real

The vast sea of sagebrush-steppe rangelands that supported iconic wildlife and many ecosystem services has been heavily impacted by exotic plant invasions and altered wildfire, motivating one of the largest restoration and rehabilitation efforts globally. Members of the Great Basin Chapter of SER will describe the efforts, past and future, from scientific and management perspectives, and address the needs and prospects for an adaptive management approach.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

The emergence of the social‐ecological restoration concept

Many ecosystems in the world are the result of a close interaction between local people and their environment, which are currently recognized as social‐ecological systems (SoES). Natural catastrophes or long‐standing social and political turmoil can degrade these SoES to a point where human societies are no longer autonomous and their supporting ecosystems are highly degraded. Here, the authors focus on the special case of the restoration of SoES termed social‐ecological restoration (SoER), which is characterized as a restoration process that cannot avoid simultaneously dealing with ecological and social issues. In practice, SoER is analogous in many ways to the general principles of ecological restoration, but it differs in three key aspects: (1) the first actions may be initially intended for human groups that need to recover minimum living standards; (2) the SoER process would often be part of a healing process for local people where cultural values of ecosystems play an essential role; and (3) there is a strong dependency on external economic inputs, as the people belonging to the SoES may be incapable of reorganizing themselves on their own and supporting ecosystems can no longer self‐recover.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2018

Communicating useful results from restoration ecology research

Interactions between restoration ecologists and stakeholders (policy makers and decision makers, volunteers, public supporters) benefit from clear communication of research findings. Given that adaptive management (e.g. learning while restoring) already stresses frequent and effective discourse among researchers and stakeholders, it seems that a new specialty under a new term, “translational ecology,” adds more confusion than clarity. Communicating technical information to nontechnical audiences benefits from simple rules—be clear and concise, retain familiar terms that serve well, and use fewer words.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2018

Post-fire soil management

Soils are an important natural capital and can be negatively affected by high severity fires. The capacity of soil to recover from the degradation caused by fire disturbance depends on fire history, ash properties, topography, post-fire weather, vegetation recuperation and post-fire management. These factors are interdependent, and can increase or decrease the effects of high severity fires on soil degradation. Normally, ecosystems are resilient to fire disturbance and a scenario of no intervention should be considered. Post-fire management should be carried out in specific areas that are more susceptible to degradation. Post-fire interventions such as mulching are important to decrease soil degradation, whereas salvage logging increases it. Overall, the management options that we choose can trigger or reduce positive and negative impacts on soil.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2018

Restoration and ecological management of boreal forests

Presented by Kaisa Junninen of Metsähallitus Parks & Wildlife Finland.This presentation is an overview on the measures, ecological effects and challenges of restoration and ecological management of Finnish forest reserves. Over 16,000 hectares of heath forest have been treated with restoration measures in protected areas of Finland since 2003. The measures include prescribed burning, increasing dead wood, opening small canopy gaps, removing exotic plant species, and others. Burning in particular has proven to be ecologically effective, whereas artificial creation of dead wood creates unexpected ecological challenges, including the effects of wood quality on decayer communities, and the increased risk of bark beetle outbreaks due to warming climate.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Restoring Forests and Landscapes: The Key to a Sustainable Future

This report by the Global Partnership on Forest and Landscape Restoration (GPFLR) presents an overview of the challenges and opportunities for implementing forest restoration on a global scale and achieving internationally agreed targets for restoring degraded lands. The study chronicles the results of long-term and large-scale research and outlines several case studies in forest and landscape restoration.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2018

Networked and embedded scientific experiments will improve restoration outcomes

Vast areas of degraded land have proliferated worldwide. In response to this transformation, ambitious targets have been set to restore degraded ecosystems, such as the Bonn Challenge, which aims to restore 350 million ha of forestland by 2030. Achieving such goals will require a larger evidence base of restoration studies, which could be realized by systematically embedding scientific experiments within restoration programs. We examine the feasibility of this strategy with examples of successful transdisciplinary research involving embedded experiments in associated fields, and recommend that such field sites be linked to create a global network of embedded experiments. To unify a networked approach, we call on restoration stakeholders to develop acceptable industry standards of experimental design. Finally, we suggest how to use this strategy effectively to meet the biome‐scale challenges of the coming decades.

Resource Type: Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2018

Wetland Revegetation: Tools, Techniques and Best Practices

North Fork Native Plants specializes in innovative products for the restoration, reclamation and landscaping industries. An array of products feature wetland sod, bare root wetland plants, deep rooted willows, custom grown coir logs, wildlife islands, containerized native plants and custom growing services. Current projects include large scale restorations of aquatic habitats in Idaho, Montana and Colorado.

1) Tim Watters, Owner, North Fork Native Plants. Tim joined NFNP in 2006 after moving from the Midwest to eastern Idaho. He has prior experience in business management/ ownership and investment banking. Tim leads the sales and marketing team and oversees all operations and finance matters.

2) Ann Lefler, Marketing, Sales & Operations Support Manager, North Fork Native Plants. Ann joined NFNP in 2017 and is a fifth generation Idaho native. She earned a B.S. in Natural Resource Management and Watershed Science from Colorado State University and is currently pursuing an MS in Restoration Ecology at the University of Idaho. Ann has 20 years experience in hydrology, water quality and botany.

Resource Type: Webinar
Publication Date: 2018

Parks Canada: Restoration Case Studies

This compendium of case studies is a companion to the Principles and Guidelines for Ecological Restoration in Canada’s Protected Natural Areas. The case studies are from a variety of parks and other protected natural areas across Canada and illustrate a broad range of restoration challenges and solutions. They demonstrate approaches to ecological restoration that are 1) Effective in restoring and maintaining ecological integrity, 2) Efficient in using practical and economic methods to achieve functional success, and 3) Engaging through implementing inclusive processes and by recognizing and embracing interrelationships between culture and nature.

Resource Type: Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2017

Partnering with Nature: The case for natural regeneration in forest and landscape restoration

Natural regeneration is a cost-effective, nature-based tool for restoration that enhances resilience, supports local biodiversity, and supplies multiple ecosystem goods and services. However, for social, cultural and economic reasons, the potential of natural regeneration for achieving large-scale restoration objectives and climate mitigation targets is often overlooked. This information brief makes specific recommendations for policy changes that could enhance the role of natural regeneration in ecological restoration interventions and as an integral component of forest and landscape restoration.

Resource Type: White Paper
Publication Date: 2017