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Resources

21 matching resources found.

A diagnostic for collaborative monitoring in forest landscape restoration

Abstract:

Forest landscape restoration (FLR) requires a long-term commitment from a range of stakeholders to plan the restoration initiative collaboratively and see it through successfully. This is only possible when the people involved – whether they are landholders, indigenous groups, government entities, non-governmental organizations or other crucial actors – come together to define common goals and monitor progress toward those goals. Collaborative monitoring can play a crucial role in these processes by providing a structured way to include diverse stakeholders in FLR, generate local buy-in and catalyze social learning. However, collaborative monitoring is new to many FLR planners and, while they may be interested in implementing collaborative monitoring, they may not know where to start. This diagnostic provides a systematic way for FLR planners to assess their FLR initiatives against a checklist of success factors. The diagnostic helps practitioners to: (1) determine whether they are ready for collaborative monitoring; (2) identify what elements need to strengthened; and (3) assess whether existing monitoring systems are on the right track. The diagnostic can be applied on at least two scales: it includes factors to be used at a specific FLR site and it outlines the factors that are intrinsic to a multi-level collaborative monitoring system. It consists of a core matrix of 42 success factors, plus suggestions for performing the assessment.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2019
STAPER categories:
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan

Application of Quality Assurance and Quality Control Principles to Ecological Restoration Project Monitoring

Abstract:

This guidance is intended to encourage and facilitate the adoption of effective quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) strategies in support of ecological restoration projects. Anticipated users include ecological restoration specialists and stakeholders representing federal, state and tribal agencies, NGOs, civic and local groups, and the academic community. Although it is assumed that users will have some background in and knowledge of basic ecological restoration practices and QA/QC concepts, Chapter 2 includes a brief review of QA/QC principles that are discussed throughout the remainder of the document.

The practices, procedures, information, and concepts outlined in this guidance can provide the following benefits to practitioners and stakeholders:

  • Save time and resources by enhancing the consistency of documentation and procedures in current and future projects.
  • Improve data quality for ecological measurements and observations, aid in evaluating project success, and incorporate long-term effectiveness monitoring as feedback to adaptive management.
  • Encourage a common approach to QA/QC across multiple entities involved in ecological restoration projects to improve data comparability over time and support comparison of various restoration strategies.
  • Serve as a consolidated collection of the best QA/QC practices for ecological restoration projects across multiple agencies.
Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2019
STAPER categories:
  • A1: Assess degraded ecosystems
  • A4: Assess the costs/benefits of ecosystem restoration
  • B4: Review, improve or establish terrestrial and marine spatial planning processes
  • B5: Consider the need for safeguard measures
  • B6: Review, improve or establish targets, policies and strategies for ecosystem restoration
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management

Atlantic Forest Restoration Pact (PACTO) Monitoring Protocol

Abstract:

The Atlantic Forest Restoration Pact (PACTO), a joint effort by Brazilian public and private institutions, governments, companies, the scientific community, and landowners to generate results in restoration and conservation of biodiversity of the Atlantic Forest biome, has developed a monitoring protocol for tropical forest restoration. It includes ecological, socioecological and management principles and criteria. A review of this protocol has also been published, suggesting that this protocol may also be useful in other regions of the world.

 

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
The monitoring protocol developed for the Atlantic Forest biome is an excellent example of work conducted in line with activity D1, whereby monitoring plans are developed and implemented through close collaboration with multiple stakeholders. This protocol also uses pre-existing restoration efforts in the Atlantic Forest biome to share lessons learned with all stakeholders, relevant to activity D3.

Resource Type:Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2013
STAPER categories:
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

Biodiversity Indicators Partnership (BIP)

Abstract:

The Biodiversity Indicators Partnership (BIP) is a global initiative to promote and coordinate the development and delivery of biodiversity indicators for use by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and other biodiversity-related conventions, the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and national and regional agencies. The website allows users to browse a range of indicators related to Aichi Biodiversity Targets, as well as a library of resources for the development of national-scale indicators.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
The BIP resource provides tools to identify relevant indicators for assessing multiple restoration objectives directly relevant to CBD goals and targets (D1), to test and refine indicators (D2), and to develop monitoring and reporting systems (D3).

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing
STAPER categories:
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

Ecological Restoration for Protected Areas: Principles, Guidelines and Best Practice

Abstract:

IUCN, SER and partners published Ecological Restoration for Protected Areas: Principles, Guidelines and Best Practices, which provides guidance for terrestrial, marine, and freshwater protected area managers at both system and site levels on the restoration of natural and associated values of protected areas.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
This comprehensive guidance can assist with identifying appropriate restoration measures (C1), developing restoration plans (C3), developing tasks, schedules and budgets (C4), and project implementation (C5). It is also relevant regarding activities in Group D, monitoring.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2012
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management

First ex situ outplanting of the habitat- forming seaweed Cystoseira amentacea var. stricta from a restoration perspective

Abstract:

In the framework of the EU project ROCPOP-Life, the first ex situ outplanting experience on Cystoseira amentacea var. stricta has been implemented in the Cinque Terre MPA (northwestern Mediterranean). A total of 400 clay tiles were fixed to the rocky shore with screws: the tiles were monitored for the next two months by photographic sampling, and survival, cover and growth were assessed. After two months, over 40% of the tiles were covered with Cystoseira juveniles, which reached approximately 8 mm in total length. The high cover (> 25%), assuring moisture and shading, and the appropriate size of the juveniles, to avert micro-grazing, at time of deployment were key to the survival and growth of the outplanted juveniles.Our finding show that outplanting of midlittoral canopy-forming species is a feasible approach for restoration efforts, with particular attention given to the early phases: i) laboratory culture, ii) transport, and iii) juveniles densities.

Resource Type:Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2019
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan

Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism (FLRM) Knowledge Base

Abstract:

This knowledge base provides access to a comprehensive database of resources related to forest and landscape restoration in a wide range of aspects. More specifically, it provides access to an online user-friendly platform where users can find guidance from planning and implementation to the ongoing management and monitoring of a restoration project.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
This resource includes information on many aspects of FLR including assessment of degradation / restoration opportunities (activities A1 and A2), governance (activities B1 and B6), and implementation (activity C5), and monitoring (Group D). Documents such as Global guidelines for the restoration of degraded forests and landscapes in drylands, outline monitoring and evaluation programs including assessment (D1), adaptive management (D2), and sharing lessons learned (D3).

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing
STAPER categories:
  • A1: Assess degraded ecosystems
  • A2: Identify/prioritize locations for meeting national contributions to Aichi Targets
  • B1: Review, improve or establish legal, policy and financial frameworks for restoration
  • B6: Review, improve or establish targets, policies and strategies for ecosystem restoration
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

Global guidelines for the restoration of degraded forests and landscapes in drylands

Abstract:

This publication, “Global guidelines for the restoration of degraded forests and landscapes in drylands”, is an output of the FAO Drylands Restoration Initiative, drawing lessons from the many experiences in dryland restoration worldwide. It is targeted at policymakers and other decision-makers, and dryland restoration practitioners, because both groups have the power to bring about positive change.

Resource Type:White Paper
Publication Date: 2015
STAPER categories:
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

Implementing forest landscape restoration: A practitioner’s guide

Abstract:

Recognizing the challenge of implementing high-level FLR pledges, and realizing that obtaining results on the ground will confront many context-specific questions, a team of scientists from relevant IUFRO units has prepared this guide. This guide is intended to be a training resource for FLR facilitators who have a broad approach to land management. This guide addresses FLR implementation as a whole but with a view toward climate change mitigation and adaptation; only if the landscape is changing and FLR is successful will climate benefits materialise.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
This publication has broad applicability to Groups of activities C and D with regard to projects implemented within the FLR framework.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2017
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C2: Consider how restoration can support sustainability of agriculture/production
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

International standards for the practice of ecological restoration, 1st edition (Archived – outdated)

Abstract:

*** NOTE: This document, International Standards for the Practice of Ecological Restoration, has been superseded by the 2nd edition. ***

The first edition includes Principles and Key Concepts (hereafter, the Standards), provides standards to guide practitioners, operational personnel, planners, managers, regulators and funding agencies involved in restoring degraded ecosystems anywhere in the world – whether terrestrial, freshwater, coastal or marine. It places ecological restoration into a global context, including its role in conserving biodiversity and improving human wellbeing. The key principles and concepts underpinning the Standards further develop definitions, principles and concepts contained in the SER Primer (www.ser.org), other SER foundation documents (including Keenleyside et al. 2012), and the SER Australasia-developed standards (McDonald et al. 2016). The Standards expand these conceptual frameworks to clarify the degree of recovery represented by ‘ecological restoration’ in times of global changes including anthropogenic climate change and other rapid environmental changes.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2016
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management

International standards for the practice of ecological restoration, 2nd edition

Abstract:

The second edition of the International Standards for the Practice of Ecological Restoration was released on September 27, 2019, in Cape Town, South Africa at SER’s 8th World Conference on Ecological Restoration. This groundbreaking publication provides updated and expanded guidance on the practice of ecological restoration, clarifies the breadth of ecological restoration and allied environmental repair activities, and includes ideas and input from a diverse international group of restoration scientists and practitioners.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
The Standards provide information on the planning, implementation, monitoring and maintenance of ecological restoration projects in all types of ecosystems worldwide, providing key guidance for Groups of activities C and D. This resource stresses the importance of early, genuine and active engagement with stakeholders and emphasizes the use of appropriate native species in line with activity C1. Guidance can also be applied to allied restorative activities, including a wide array of nature-based solutions, in line with C2. Section 3 outlines a series of steps used to develop clear objectives and tasks for each step of a plan, in line with activities, C3 and C4. An appendix provides information on the selection of seeds and other propagules in the context of fragmentation and climate change, helpful for activity C2. The Standards also contain guidance for the monitoring of restoration projects. This guidance includes a tiered system from 1 to 5 stars to evaluate progress of a restoration project (D1) along a trajectory toward a reference model by assessing six key ecological attributes: species composition, structural diversity, ecosystem function, external exchanges, absence of threats, and physical conditions. An ‘ecological recovery wheel’, available online and as an Android app provides a framework to communicate restoration progress (D3). The SER Standards also provide a sample 'Social Benefits Wheel' to help assess and communicate the delivery of ecosystem services by restoration projects, in line with activities D1 and D3.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2019
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C2: Consider how restoration can support sustainability of agriculture/production
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

Participatory monitoring to connect local and global priorities for forest restoration

Abstract:

New, global initiatives to restore forest landscapes present an unparalleled opportunity to reverse deforestation and forest degradation. Participatory monitoring could play a crucial role in providing accountability, generating local buy in, and catalyzing learning in monitoring systems that need scalability and adaptability to a range of local sites. We synthesized current knowledge from literature searches and interviews to provide lessons for the development of a scalable, multisite participatory monitoring system. Studies show that local people can collect accurate data on forest change, drivers of change, threats to reforestation, and biophysical and socioeconomic impacts that remote sensing cannot. They can do this at one-third the cost of professionals. Successful participatory monitoring systems collect information on a few simple indicators, respond to local priorities, provide appropriate incentives for participation, catalyze learning and decision making based on frequent analyses and multilevel interactions with other stakeholders. Participatory monitoring could provide a framework for linking global, national, and local needs, aspirations, and capacities for forest restoration.

Resource Type:Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2018
STAPER categories:
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

Rate of forest recovery after fire exclusion on anthropogenic savannas in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Abstract:

Deforestation in the tropics is often followed by the creation of anthropogenic savannas used for animal husbandry. By discontinuing burning regimes, forests may recolonize the savanna and carbon stocksmay recover. However, little is known about the success and speed of tropical forest recovery, while such information is vital for a better quantification of efforts to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) as well as supporting Forest LandscapeRestoration (FLR) practices. Therefore, we designed a forest regeneration experiment within a savanna patch in the Mayombe hills(Democratic Republic of Congo), by discontinuing the annual burning regime in an 88 ha exclosure since 2005. 101 permanent inventory plots (40.4 ha) were installed in 2010 and remeasured in 2014. Tree species were classified as savanna or forest specialists. We estimate a forest specialist encroachment rate of 9 stems ha−1 yr−1 and a savanna specialist disappearance rate of 16 stems ha−1 yr−1. Average diameter of forest specialists did not change due to an increasing influx of recruits, while average diameter of savanna trees increased due to decreasing recruitment. Carbon stored by forest specialists increased from 3.12 to 5.60 Mg C ha−1, suggesting a forest carbon recovery rate of 0.62 Mg C ha−1 yr−1. Using the average carbon stock of 19 nearby mature rainforestplots as a reference, we estimate a total forest carbon recovery time of at least 150 years. The Manzonzi exclosure may potentially become an important reference experiment to quantify REDD+ schemes in Central Africa. Furthermore, this natural regeneration experiment demonstrates how carbon sequestration and biodiversity conservation can go hand-in-hand. However, more censuses are needed to better quantify the long-term carbon recovery trajectory within the protected area.

Resource Type:Peer-reviewed Article
Publication Date: 2019
STAPER categories:
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan

Recovery strategies for industrial development in native grassland in the Foothills Fescue, Foothills Parkland and Montane natural subregions of Alberta

Abstract:

Alberta’s Grassland Natural Region has been significantly modified by land use practices.  The black Chernozemic soils and rough fescue plant communities typical of the Foothills Fescue, Foothills Parkland and Montane Natural Sub-regions (FFPM) are extremely difficult to restore once disturbed due to the prevalence of invasive species in the region and a shortage of suitable reclamation plant materials. Avoidance and minimizing topsoil disturbance are critical to minimize further loss of these communities to development in the FFPM.

This manual describes tools for planning native grassland retention and restoration, including pre-disturbance planning and recovery strategies, such as minimal disturbance, buffers, sourcing plant materials and native seed mix design. Implementing a strategy is explained, including site preparation, soil amendments and procuring native plant materials, then maintaining the pathway through adaptive management. Appendices include suitable seed mixes to develop target plant communities for ecological range sites and ecosites common in the FFPM.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2018
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C2: Consider how restoration can support sustainability of agriculture/production
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management

Recovery strategies for industrial development in native grassland in the Northern Fescue natural subregion of Alberta

Abstract:

Alberta’s Grassland Natural Region is significantly modified by land use practices. Much of the native grassland in the Northern Fescue Natural Sub-region (NF) has been lost to cultivation and fragmented by industrial activity and roads. Soils and climate of the NF promote the spread of invasive non-native plants when soils are disturbed. This document identifies strategies designed retain and restore NF grassland plant communities following industrial disturbance.

The manual describes tools available for planning native grassland retention and restoration, including pre-disturbance planning and recovery strategies, such as minimal disturbance, buffers, natural recovery and native seed mix design. Implementing a strategy is explained including site preparation, soil amendments and procuring native seed, then maintaining the pathway using invasive plant and grazing management, and long-term monitoring. Appendices include a summary of regional reclamation studies and suitable seed mixes to develop target plant communities for ecological range sites common in the NF.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2017
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management

Recovery strategies for industrial development in native prairie in the Dry Mixedgrass natural subregion of Alberta

Abstract:

Alberta’s Grassland Natural Region has been significantly modified by land use practices.  The semi-arid climate of the Dry Mixedgrass Natural Subregion (DMG) supports native plant communities adapted to drought. Minimizing soil disturbance and natural recovery are often the most effective strategies for restoring DMG native plant communities. This document identifies strategies designed to retain and restore native grassland plant communities following disturbance in the DMG. This manual describes tools for planning native grassland retention and restoration, including pre-disturbance planning and recovery strategies, such as minimal disturbance, buffers, natural recovery and native seed mix design. Implementing a strategy is explained, including site preparation, soil amendments and procuring native seed, then maintaining the pathway using invasive plant and grazing management, and long-term monitoring. Appendices include a summary of regional reclamation studies and suitable seed mixes to develop target plant communities for ecological range sites common in the DMG.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2013
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C2: Consider how restoration can support sustainability of agriculture/production
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management

Recovery strategies for industrial development in native prairie in the Mixedgrass natural subregion of Alberta

Abstract:

Alberta’s Grassland Natural Region is significantly modified by land use practices.  The soils and climate of the Mixedgrass Natural Sub-region (MG) promote the spread of invasive plants when soil is disturbed. Minimizing soil disturbance and natural recovery are often the most effective strategies for restoring MG plant communities. This document identifies strategies designed to retain and restore native plant communities following industrial disturbance in the MG.

This manual describes tools for planning native grassland retention and restoration, including pre-disturbance planning and recovery strategies, such as minimal disturbance, buffers, natural recovery and native seed mix design. Implementing a strategy is explained including site preparation, soil amendments and procuring native seed, then maintaining the pathway using invasive plant and grazing management, and long-term monitoring. Appendices include a summary of regional reclamation studies and suitable seed mixes to develop target plant communities for ecological range sites common in the MG.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2014
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C2: Consider how restoration can support sustainability of agriculture/production
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management

Roadside revegetation: An integrated approach to establishing native plants and pollinator habitat

Abstract:

The roadsides of the United States play an important role in the conservation of declining wild pollinators and in supporting the health of managed pollinators. The An Integrated Approach to Establishing Native Plants and Pollinator Habitat program provides current best practices for planning, designing, and implementing a revegetation project that will also create habitat for pollinators. The web resource offers a comprehensive Roadside Revegetation Report detailing the complete roadside revegetation process, from project initiation, through monitoring and management. It is also home to the Ecoregional Revegetation Application online tool and a Roadside Revegetation online library.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management

Science Base and Tools for Evaluating Stream Engineering, Management, and Restoration Proposals

Abstract:

Stream management activities, even well-intentioned restoration efforts, have all too often degraded aquatic ecosystems. Site- and reach-scale habitat improvement projects have become the default solution to many habitat deficiencies and constraints, and are often planned and implemented without proper consideration of their landscape context, process drivers, or geomorphic fitness. Failure to recognize these broader scale concerns may lead to poor project selection and increased potential for project failure. To address these issues, we developed a suite of River Restoration Analysis Tool (RiverRAT) resources to guide more efficient, consistent, and comprehensive reviews of stream management and restoration proposals. Resources help determine the depth of review required, assure that a project proposal is complete, and guide reviewers through a thorough and scientifically sound project review. The RiverRAT Science Document and its Appendices provide a comprehensive synthesis of science behind stream management and restoration project development.
The ultimate, long-term goals of RiverRAT include:
• Enabling consistent, comprehensive, transparent, and documented project reviews;
• facilitating improved project planning and design;
• encouraging projects that are attuned to their watershed and geomorphic context; and
• improving the science and technology of stream restoration and management.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2011
STAPER categories:
  • B4: Review, improve or establish terrestrial and marine spatial planning processes
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management

SER Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner (CERP) Program

Abstract:

SER’s Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner (CERP) Program encourages a high professional standard for those who are designing, implementing, overseeing, and monitoring restoration projects throughout the world.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
By developing criteria for restoration practitioners to be approved for CERP, and continuing education requirements for maintenance or certification, the CERP program contributes to activity B10. Certified practitioners, in turn, can contribute to activities C1, C3, C4, and C5 regarding restoration planning and implementation, and activities D1, D2, and D3 regarding project monitoring.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: Ongoing
STAPER categories:
  • B10: Promote and support capacity-building, training, and technology transfer
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

Success from the ground up: Participatory monitoring and forest restoration

Abstract:

The potential of participatory monitoring in forest restoration and related forest management activities is explored in this review through multiple case studies, experiences, field tests and conceptual discussions. The review seeks to deepen and broaden our understanding of participatory monitoring by teasing out the lessons learned from existing knowledge and mapping a possible path forward, with the aim of improving the outcomes of forest restoration initiatives.

 

 

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
This resource emphasizes the importance of developing participatory monitoring programs with stakeholders, particularly relevant for activity D1, adjusting restoration activities based on monitoring data collected, relevant to activity D2, and communicating lesson learned in line with activity D3.

Resource Type:White Paper
Publication Date: 2016
STAPER categories:
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

Projects

7 matching projects found.

Cameroon: Floodplain Rehabilitation through Prescribed Flooding of Waza-Logone

Country: Cameroon

Abstract: Managed flood releases are gaining acceptance in Africa as a strategy for ameliorating the ecological impacts of large dams and promoting integrated rural development. Prescribed flooding projects have been conducted in the Zambezi River Basin of Mozambique; Pongolo River Basin of South Africa; Komadugu Yobé River Basin of Nigeria; and Senegal River Basin between Senegal and Mauritania. This project, managed by the Government of Cameroon in cooperation with the IUCN and other international...
STAPER categories:
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

Ecohydrological restoration of Burns Bog, British Columbia, Canada

Country: Canada

Abstract: Burns Bog is a 3,000 ha raised bog located in southwest British Columbia, Canada. Beginning in the 1930s, the bog underwent 50 years of industrial peat extraction, resulting in an extensive network of drainage ditches that lowered the water table and allowed the establishment of trees and other non-bog plant species. Much of the original margin of the bog has been converted to other land uses, such as industrial operations and agriculture. In 2004, Burns Bog was purchased by four levels of...
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C2: Consider how restoration can support sustainability of agriculture/production
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management

France: Restoration of Floodplain Wetlands in the Mediterranean Region

Country: France

Abstract: Restoration of wetlands has become an increasing field of application of ecological research due to mitigation regulations, changes in agricultural practices and an increasing consideration of the role of wetlands in the water cycle. In areas where the history of human use of natural areas is old and intense, restoration projects must not only consider ecological objectives but also social aspects. The Vistre project was developed to answer a social demand of restoring the flood storage...
STAPER categories:
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan

Healthy Forest, Healthy Wildlife: The Wilds, Cumberland, Ohio

Country: United States of America

Abstract: The Wilds is a non-profit center dedicated to environmental conservation through science, education, and visitor personal experience. While The Wilds is most well-known for its exotic animals, most of The Wilds' land is actually devoted to native conservation and restoration after agriculture and surface mining for coal in the late 20th century removed most of the region's forests. Sections mined before 1976 tended to be reclaimed as forest and often have poorly developed soils with...
STAPER categories:
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan

Iraq: Reviving Eden – The Iraqi Marshlands

Country: Iraq

Abstract: The Iraqi Marshlands are one of the world's largest wetland ecosystems and constitute the largest wetland ecosystem in the Middle East and Western Eurasia. The Iraqi Marshlands are a crucial part of intercontinental flyways for migratory birds, support endangered species, and sustain freshwater fisheries, as well as the marine ecosystem of the Persian Gulf. In addition to their ecological importance, these Marshlands are unique from the global perspective of human heritage. The area's natural...
STAPER categories:
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

Renature Monchique

Country: Portugal

Abstract: The primary objective of this partner-based project is to begin a process that assists private landowners within the municipal district of Monchique, Algarve Region, Portugal, affected by the wildfire of 2018. As most landowners have small-holdings, the project-based process required to access financial support is onerous and in many instances linked to reforestation legislation. The one-year project is funded by the Ryanair passengers Carbon Offset Fund. Based on ecological restoration...

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
Recover fire-damaged and degraded sites

STAPER categories:
  • A1: Assess degraded ecosystems
  • A2: Identify/prioritize locations for meeting national contributions to Aichi Targets
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • A4: Assess the costs/benefits of ecosystem restoration
  • A5: Assess institutional, policy, and legal frameworks & identify financial/technical resources
  • A6: Identify options to reduce the drivers biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation
  • B1: Review, improve or establish legal, policy and financial frameworks for restoration
  • B4: Review, improve or establish terrestrial and marine spatial planning processes
  • B5: Consider the need for safeguard measures
  • B6: Review, improve or establish targets, policies and strategies for ecosystem restoration
  • B8: Promote economic and financial incentives
  • B10: Promote and support capacity-building, training, and technology transfer
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C2: Consider how restoration can support sustainability of agriculture/production
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

USA: New Jersey: Mount Rose Preserve Forest Restoration Project

Country: United States of America

Abstract: The Mount Rose Preserve Forest Restoration Project is sited within an area of the Mount Rose Preserve in Hopewell, NJ, comprised of forests over a hundred years old but with a very limited forest understory due to deer overbrowse. The primary restoration goal is to re-establish a diverse, structurally complex understory such as found within the target reference ecosystem. A secondary goal is to innovate and communicate locally appropriate forest restoration practices. Additional goals include...
STAPER categories:
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan