STAPER

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Resources

10 matching resources found.

A diagnostic for collaborative monitoring in forest landscape restoration

Abstract:

Forest landscape restoration (FLR) requires a long-term commitment from a range of stakeholders to plan the restoration initiative collaboratively and see it through successfully. This is only possible when the people involved – whether they are landholders, indigenous groups, government entities, non-governmental organizations or other crucial actors – come together to define common goals and monitor progress toward those goals. Collaborative monitoring can play a crucial role in these processes by providing a structured way to include diverse stakeholders in FLR, generate local buy-in and catalyze social learning. However, collaborative monitoring is new to many FLR planners and, while they may be interested in implementing collaborative monitoring, they may not know where to start. This diagnostic provides a systematic way for FLR planners to assess their FLR initiatives against a checklist of success factors. The diagnostic helps practitioners to: (1) determine whether they are ready for collaborative monitoring; (2) identify what elements need to strengthened; and (3) assess whether existing monitoring systems are on the right track. The diagnostic can be applied on at least two scales: it includes factors to be used at a specific FLR site and it outlines the factors that are intrinsic to a multi-level collaborative monitoring system. It consists of a core matrix of 42 success factors, plus suggestions for performing the assessment.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2019
STAPER categories:
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan

A guide to the Restoration Opportunities Assessment Methodology (ROAM) : Assessing forest landscape restoration opportunities at the national or sub-national level : working paper

Abstract:

This handbook presents the Restoration Opportunities Assessment Methodology (ROAM), which provides a flexible and affordable framework for countries to rapidly identify and analyse FLR potential and locate special areas of opportunity at a national or sub-national level. The handbook offers practical advice and options to bear in mind when considering or conducting an FLR assessment using ROAM, as well as real-life examples of the kinds of outputs you can expect, and will enable you to commission or design a tailor-made process to meet your specific needs.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
One important component of the application of the ROAM is the mapping of areas of potential for restoration. This is typically done through GIS analysis of relevant datasets, including datasets on levels of degradation (in accordance with activity A1). Drawing on further map datasets and expert knowledge, opportunity areas can then be categorized, for instance by general type of restoration (wide- scale, mosaic, protective) or by priority (high, medium, low), in accordance with activity A2. It also describes some of the concepts and basic steps required for the modelling of costs and benefits of restoration (A4) The methodology also describes how to engage stakeholders throughout the assessment process, in line with activity A3 and provides examples of criteria and indicators for the assessment of the legal, institutional, policy context, in line with activity A5. In 2018, IUCN released the Biodiversity Guidelines for Restoration Opportunities Assessments, which provide more context, more resources, and fresh perspectives relevant to the ongoing global interaction between forest landscape restoration and national biodiversity target, making it particularly relevant in the implementation of activity A2. While most relevant for group of activities A, the methodology can also assist in the implementation of further steps such as the development of plans for resources mobilization (B9) and the identification of appropriate measures for ecosystem restoration (C1).

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2014
STAPER categories:
  • A1: Assess degraded ecosystems
  • A2: Identify/prioritize locations for meeting national contributions to Aichi Targets
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders

Asia-Pacific Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) Repository

Abstract:

Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) in the context of REDD+ continues to be a challenging concept. There is no single internationally agreed definition. Neither is there a single way to implement FPIC. It varies across regions, countries, contexts, peoples and communities. There is, however, a growing body of practitioners, be it UN-REDD Programme partner countries, or REDD+ project developers, who have taken the discussion beyond the realm of the rhetoric into actual demonstration. This repository aims to facilitate and encourage knowledge and experience exchange among practitioners as well as those interested to embark on FPIC within the Asia-Pacific region.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
This is a repository for information on a safeguarding system that can be used to engage stakeholders and protect their fundamental rights (A3).

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2019
STAPER categories:
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders

Best practices for implementing forest landscape restoration in South Asia: An international knowledge sharing workshop

Abstract:

In 2018, the Ministry of Mahaweli Development and Environment and Forest Department, Sri Lanka, in cooperation with the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) and others, members of the Global Partnership on Forest and Landscape Restoration (GPFLR) held a knowledge-sharing workshop on best practices in implementing forest landscape restoration in South Asian countries.

The workshop aimed at:

  • Sharing and discussing lessons from current state-of-the-art scientific and technical knowledge on FLR both at global and regional scales;
  • Connecting FLR experts in South Asia and further stimulating exchanges of information, thus providing feedback into national and global FLR policy initiatives such as the Bonn Challenge process;
  • Identifying challenges of current land management and impediments to sustainable land management and ecosystem functionality across the region; and
  • Contributing to the development of a regional FLR implementation strategy in support of continuous sub-regional learning, sharing of experiences and FLR practice improvements.

This webpage houses a summary of the workshop conclusions, as well as all of the workshop presentations.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2018
STAPER categories:
  • A2: Identify/prioritize locations for meeting national contributions to Aichi Targets
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • A5: Assess institutional, policy, and legal frameworks & identify financial/technical resources
  • B6: Review, improve or establish targets, policies and strategies for ecosystem restoration
  • B10: Promote and support capacity-building, training, and technology transfer
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C2: Consider how restoration can support sustainability of agriculture/production
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

IPBES Assessment Report on Land Degradation and Restoration

Abstract:

The Assessment Report on Land Degradation and Restoration by the IPBES provides a critical analysis of the state of knowledge regarding the importance, drivers, status, and trends of terrestrial ecosystems. The assessment covers the global status of and trends in land degradation, by region and land cover type; the effect of degradation on biodiversity values, ecosystem services and human well-being; and the state of knowledge, by region and land cover type, of ecosystem restoration extent and options. The assessment was undertaken to enhance the knowledge base for policies for addressing land degradation, desertification and the restoration of degraded land.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
Chapter 8.2 of the Assessment Report on Land Degradation and Restoration of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES 2018) reviews and discusses information, knowledge and decision support tools to identify land degradation problems, prevention and restoration options, which operate at the global, national, subnational, watershed, and sub-watershed scales. The section on identifying and mapping current land degradation directly addresses activity A1 and provides links to and descriptions of multiple land degradation assessment tools. Activity A2 is addressed in the sections on analyses of land degradation avoidance solutions and restoration options, including quantitative and comparative tools for finding restoration solutions, and tools for spatial prioritization (e.g., ROAM). Stakeholder participation (A3), costs and benefits of different management options (A4), institutional and financial aspects of decision-making (A5), and tools to reduce degradation and biodiversity losses (A6) are also discussed.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2018
STAPER categories:
  • A1: Assess degraded ecosystems
  • A2: Identify/prioritize locations for meeting national contributions to Aichi Targets
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • A4: Assess the costs/benefits of ecosystem restoration
  • A5: Assess institutional, policy, and legal frameworks & identify financial/technical resources
  • A6: Identify options to reduce the drivers biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation

Mapping social landscapes: A guide to identifying the networks, priorities, and values of restoration actors

Abstract:

The guidebook takes a new approach to environmental governance by focusing on identifying the social capital of actors within the landscapes. It centers on two main approaches: 1) mapping actors’ resource flows and 2) mapping actors’ priorities and values. Co-written by WRI international offices, this methodology has been tested in Brazil, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, and Rwanda. The guidebook focuses primarily on restoration, but the same methodologies can be adapted to broader analysis of natural resource governance. By using this guidebook, environmental practitioners can be more efficient with resources, collaboration, and outreach, and better anticipate potential conflicts and bottlenecks.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2018
STAPER categories:
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • A5: Assess institutional, policy, and legal frameworks & identify financial/technical resources
  • B1: Review, improve or establish legal, policy and financial frameworks for restoration

Minnesota Guide for Stream Connectivity and Aquatic Organism Passage Through Culverts

Abstract:

This guide assists Minnesota culvert designers in identifying, selecting, and implementing appropriate designs for maintaining aquatic organism passage (AOP) and stream connectivity at road-stream intersections. It was synthesized from existing literature and culvert design documents, a survey of practitioners, research, and input from experts. Culvert designs often disrupt AOP, degrading stream health. Best practices for AOP at culverts were developed and summarized as follows:  1.) Design the culvert to be similar to the stream channel (reference reach), 2. Provide a continuous sediment bed with roughness similar to the channel 3.) Design for public safety, longevity, and resilience.

Resource Type:Technical Document
Publication Date: 2019
STAPER categories:
  • A1: Assess degraded ecosystems
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • A5: Assess institutional, policy, and legal frameworks & identify financial/technical resources
  • A6: Identify options to reduce the drivers biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation
  • B3: Promote and strengthen formal and informal education systems
  • B6: Review, improve or establish targets, policies and strategies for ecosystem restoration
  • B10: Promote and support capacity-building, training, and technology transfer
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

REDD+ Social and Environmental Standards

Abstract:

The REDD+ Social & Environmental Standards provide a comprehensive framework of principles, criteria, and indicators along with Guidelines for their use through a participatory and transparent approach at country level. The Standards and the accompanying Guidelines were developed by the REDD+ SES Initiative through an inclusive participatory process from 2009 to provide a best-practice framework that can be used on a voluntary basis as appropriate and relevant to the country context.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
This is a source for safeguarding systems that can be used to engage stakeholders and protect their fundamental rights (A3).

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2019
STAPER categories:
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders

Resources on Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) – Forest Peoples Programme

Abstract:

Free, Prior and Informed (FRIP) is a safeguarding system that can be used to engage stakeholders and protect their fundamental rights. The Forest Peoples Programme provides a list of resources in English, Spanish, and French on this topic.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
This is a safeguarding system that can be used to engage stakeholders and protect their fundamental rights (A3).

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2017
STAPER categories:
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders

UN-REDD Programme

Abstract:

The UN-REDD Programme supports countries to apply the UNFCCC’s safeguards, and to conduct land-use planning for REDD+ to deliver multiple environmental and social benefits while reducing risk. REDD+ activities, as defined by the UNFCCC, includes the enhancement of forest carbon stocks, which may be implemented through restoration interventions.

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
The UN-REDD website contains resources on stakeholder engagement and gender balance (A3), forest governance (A4), and tenure security (B2). The Multiple Benefits webpage of the UN-REDD Programme contains a number of national and subnational scale spatial analyses of the potential for REDD+ implementation to deliver multiple benefits, which include the conservation of biodiversity, in line with activity A4. Several mapping tutorials and a GIS toolbox are also available to support REDD+ planning and secure multiple benefits.

Resource Type:Web-based Resource
Publication Date: 2019
STAPER categories:
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • A4: Assess the costs/benefits of ecosystem restoration
  • B2: Review, improve or establish a legal and policy framework for land tenure

Projects

7 matching projects found.

Costa Rica: Tropical Dry Forest Restoration in the Guanacaste Conservation Area

Country: Costa Rica

Abstract: The Guanacaste Conservation Area (ACG) in northwestern Costa Rica is the site of the largest forest restoration project in the tropics. The project is aimed at restoring a major tropical dry forest ecosystem that has been severely degraded as a result of anthropogenic fires associated with farming and ranching activities. These fires damage indigenous tree species that evolved in an ecosystem devoid of natural fire, and they also enable the invasive African grass jaragua (Hyparrhenia rufa) to...
STAPER categories:
  • A2: Identify/prioritize locations for meeting national contributions to Aichi Targets
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • A6: Identify options to reduce the drivers biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation

Indonesia: Central Kalimantan Peatlands Restoration Project

Country: Indonesia

Abstract: The Central Kalimantan Peatlands Project (CKPP) grew out of an increasing recognition at the local, national and international levels of the urgency of halting and reversing degradation of the peatswamp forests of Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Drainage, illegal logging and fire have devastated the area's peatswamps in recent decades, and the impacts on local livelihoods, the broader economy and critical wildlife habitats have been staggering. Moreover, the annual contribution to global...
STAPER categories:
  • A1: Assess degraded ecosystems
  • A2: Identify/prioritize locations for meeting national contributions to Aichi Targets
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders

Kenya: Dryland Rehabilitation and Community Resources Management by the Elangata Wuas Ecosystem Management Programme (Kajiado District)

Country: Kenya

Abstract: The Kenyan Maasai peoples' pastoral lifestyle has been curtailed since the coming of the colonial government to the present day. First, their movement was restricted South of the Uganda railway line in 1912 leading to heavy loss of prime pasture land including dry season grazing areas, salt licks and watering points. Nomadic pastoralism was perceived then as a retrogressive land use system and major cause of land degradation. In the early 1960s, the government of Kenya introduced a group ranch...
STAPER categories:
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • B8: Promote economic and financial incentives
  • B10: Promote and support capacity-building, training, and technology transfer

Madagascar: Restoration initiatives of degraded humid forests in the World Heritage site “Rainforests of the Atsinanana”

Country: Madagascar

Abstract: In collaboration with local communities, the project aims to assess the state of degradation and start restoration activities in three national parks that are part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site ‘Rainforests of the Atsinanana”, one of the most important and representative habitats of Madagascar humid forests with exceptional levels of biodiversity. These rainforests are currently placed in the World Heritage in Danger list, and projected restoration activities respond to the correctives...
STAPER categories:
  • A2: Identify/prioritize locations for meeting national contributions to Aichi Targets
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders

Renature Monchique

Country: Portugal

Abstract: The primary objective of this partner-based project is to begin a process that assists private landowners within the municipal district of Monchique, Algarve Region, Portugal, affected by the wildfire of 2018. As most landowners have small-holdings, the project-based process required to access financial support is onerous and in many instances linked to reforestation legislation. The one-year project is funded by the Ryanair passengers Carbon Offset Fund. Based on ecological restoration...

Relevance for the Short Term Action Plan for Ecosystem Restoration:
Recover fire-damaged and degraded sites

STAPER categories:
  • A1: Assess degraded ecosystems
  • A2: Identify/prioritize locations for meeting national contributions to Aichi Targets
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • A4: Assess the costs/benefits of ecosystem restoration
  • A5: Assess institutional, policy, and legal frameworks & identify financial/technical resources
  • A6: Identify options to reduce the drivers biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation
  • B1: Review, improve or establish legal, policy and financial frameworks for restoration
  • B4: Review, improve or establish terrestrial and marine spatial planning processes
  • B5: Consider the need for safeguard measures
  • B6: Review, improve or establish targets, policies and strategies for ecosystem restoration
  • B8: Promote economic and financial incentives
  • B10: Promote and support capacity-building, training, and technology transfer
  • C1: Identify appropriate measures for conducting ecosystem restoration
  • C2: Consider how restoration can support sustainability of agriculture/production
  • C3: Develop ecosystem restoration plans with clear/measurable objectives and goals  
  • C4: Develop explicit implementation tasks, schedules, and budgets
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D1: Assess the efficacy and effects of implementing the ecosystem restoration plan
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management
  • D3: Share lessons learned from planning, financing, implementing and monitoring ecosystem restoration plans

South Africa: Namaqualand Restoration Initiative – Bringing Mining, Biodiversity, and Local Communities Together

Country: South Africa

Abstract: Mining is one of the biggest threats for the long term sustainability of the unique and sensitive Namaqualand ecosystem. Namaqualand falls within the Succulent Karoo, one of only two semi-arid ecosystems to be included in the world's 34 biodiversity hotspots - areas highlighted for conservation action because of the richness of their biodiversity, its uniqueness and the level of threat that it faces. The Namaqualand Restoration Initiative (NRI) was founded by Dr. Peter Carrick (programme...
STAPER categories:
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • B10: Promote and support capacity-building, training, and technology transfer

Sylvan Lake Avon-by-the-Sea, NJ

Country: United States of America

Abstract: Sylvan lake is one of a series nine "coastal lakes" which historically discharged into the Atlantic Ocean. Along a strip of Monmouth County, NJ, these lakes form the boundaries of the towns.  Sylvan Lake divides Avon on the south with Bradley Beach to the north.  A valve is shut to the ocean, so the lake has reverted to freshwater.  The town of Avon bid this project to convert hard retaining wall to natural living...
STAPER categories:
  • A3: Involve all relevant stakeholders
  • A6: Identify options to reduce the drivers biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation
  • C5: Implement the measures
  • D2: Adjust plans, expectations, procedures, and monitoring through adaptive management